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Clock


— Children

Talking alarm clock teaches kids to tell the time... and stay in bed longer

By - November 11, 2009 3 Pictures
We’ve seen alarm clocks that make you work, think and even run in the wee hours, but here's one that actually aims to ease early morning frustration. Teach Me Time! is a talking alarm clock that's not only designed to teach children to tell the time - it can also be programmed to give them a "green light" when it's OK to get out of bed – giving parents some much needed shut-eye. Read More
— Electronics

Steuart’s Patent vacuum tank regulator – the timepiece to beat in the early 20th Century

By - October 27, 2009 1 Picture
The second in our series of interviews with Michael Bennet-Levy looks at the Steuart’s Patent vacuum tank regulator – a clock produced in 1923 that its makers, J & D Meek, claimed was accurate to “better than a second a year.” If true this would have made it the most accurate timekeeper in the world prior to the invention of Caesium clocks in the mid 1950s. The essence of the Steuart regulator is that the electric motor drives the clock and the pendulum governs and corrects the speed of the motor. Neither is connected. Ideal for telescopes (because it doesn't tick), the clock was used as a stand-in for Big Ben during WWII and in the opinion of the Scientific American it marked “the most important development in clock-making which has taken place in modern times.” Read More
— Electronics

Sony's ICF-CL75iP combination alarm clock, photo frame and iPod dock

By - September 2, 2009 2 Pictures
Alarm clocks (uncool), digital photo frames (ho-hum), and iPod/iPhone docks (seen ‘em all). Three pretty bland objects, right? But give them to Sony and what you get back is one smooth-looking piece of equipment. The Sony ICF-CL75iP has beautifully melded three boring CE products to deliver an item that would easily grace any horizontal surface at home or at the office. Read More
— Around The Home

Look, no hands: the Qlocktwo from Biegert & Funk

By - August 26, 2009 3 Pictures
What's so great about numbers anyway? And why is it that the circular form seems so sought after? After all, the Qlocktwo from proves beyond reasonable doubt that it's cool to be square and words are what matter most. The familiar rounded clock face is abandoned in favor of a stylish and elegant, cornered design where illuminated letters spell out the time at set intervals. It's time-signal receiver ensures this quartz-driven timepiece is always accurate and its interchangeable faces offer numerous color coordination options. Read More
— Science

Ytterbium times its run for next-gen atomic clocks

By - August 17, 2009 1 Picture
Technically, no clock can be more accurate than cesium standards such as NIST-F1 – the cesium fountain atomic clock that serves as the United States' primary time and frequency standard. But researchers have managed to develop an experimental atomic clock based on ytterbium atoms that boasts precision comparable to that of NIST-F1. The humble second was chosen as the International System of Units' (SI) base unit of time since it is based on the properties of the cesium atom (one second is the duration of 9,192,631,770 cycles of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the cesium 133 atom). Read More
— Around The Home

Bang & Olufsen's magical Beotime flute alarm

By - July 20, 2009 4 Pictures
Inspired by Mozart's famous Opera, the new Beotime alarm clock will, according to its creator Bang & Olufsen, turn the chore of waking up in the morning into an "extraordinary experience". As well as finding all the usual functionality of a standard alarm clock onboard, the elegant flute-like tube of aluminum can help you control all of your (compatible) audio/video gadgetry and even your room lights. As the suggested price tag of USD$375 indicates, this is no run-of-the-mill alarm clock. Read More
— Good Thinking

Routers of the future... maybe

By - July 17, 2009 9 Pictures
There are exceptions, but for the most part routers are decidedly unglamorous, which is why they are generally secreted away under a desk or otherwise hidden from view. With the Internet now so much a part of daily life they are almost invisible. So long as their lights keep flashing to provide us with our Internet fix we don’t even notice them. Now the UK’s largest broadband provider, TalkTalk, has asked Goldsmiths, University of London to give the humble router a face-lift with their vision of what the routers of the future might look like – and they’re probably not what you expected. Read More
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