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A UK researcher has infected his RFID implant with a computer virus as proof of principle ...

A researcher from the UK's University of Reading has warned of possible future infection issues for recipients of medical implants. The cause for concern is not biological, though. Dr. Mark Gasson's disquiet relates to the fact that as implants become more sophisticated, the computerized systems running them could become prone to virus attack. And to prove his point, the good doctor purposely infected a chip implanted in his hand with a virus, which subsequently spread to an external communication system.  Read More

Fully autonomous wireless temperature sensor powered by a vibrational energy harvester

Working within the Holst Centre program on Micropower Generation and Storage, researchers have developed a small piezoelectric device capable of harvesting 85 microwatts of electricity from vibrations. Fabricated using MEMS technology, the fully autonomous temperature sensor generates enough power to wirelessly measure and transmit environmental data to a base station every 15 seconds.  Read More

In 3D chips, the cores are stacked to reduce wire lengths and improve communication speeds...

We've seen vertically oriented transistors, now it's time for entire chips to explore the z-axis. Collaborating with Swiss research institutes EPFL and ETH Zurich, IBM has made another important step toward creating faster, higher-efficiency "3D" processors stacking their cores vertically to increase the number of interconnections and sensibly reduce heat.  Read More

The ZMS-08 media processor from ZiiLabs offers full 1080p, Blu-ray quality playback on a l...

With the development of the ZMS-08 system on a chip, ZiiLabs is aiming to bring high performance media processing to low power devices. As well as allowing full Blu-ray quality 1080p video playback, the chip supports simultaneous HD encode and decode, 3D and 2D image processing and advanced audio.  Read More

Lead researchers Shana Kelley and Ted Sargent with the cancer detecting microchips

Because the signature biomarkers that indicate the presence of cancer at the cellular level are generally present only at low levels in biological samples, detecting them is a procedure that usually takes days and involves a room filled with computers. Now researchers have used nanomaterials to develop a microchip small enough to fit in a device the size of a mobile phone, and sensitive enough to do the job in 30 minutes.  Read More

Mooly Eden, general manager of Intel's PC Client Group, demonstrates the difference betwee...

Intel says processing power that was reserved for desktop computing can now be conducted on laptops equipped with its new Intel Core i7 Mobile Processor and Intel Core i7 Mobile Processor Extreme Edition. Using its award-winning and super-fast Nehalem microarchitecture, along with the new Intel PM55 Express Chipset, gamers, photographers, digital music mixers, movie-makers, etc, will no longer have to be anchored to a desktop computer to access the processing power they need.  Read More

Purdue University's Tannaz Harirchian and Professor Suresh Garimella have developed a new ...

As an increasing number of hybrid-powered vehicles move from concept to completion, technology is battling to keep pace with some of the less-publicized technical challenges found among the complex electronics aboard these land- and air-based vehicles, computers and other devices. For instance, how do you effectively cool the electronics in a high-power electric motor that propels a passenger car from 0-60mph in under 10 seconds and uses regenerative braking to stop? Researchers in the U.S. believe the secret may lie in understanding precisely how fluid boils in tiny ‘microchannels’, which has led them to develop formulas and models that will help engineers design unique systems to cool high-power electronics found in today’s and tomorrow’s devices.  Read More

Atmel's new maXTouch mXT224 touchscreen controller chip

Atmel has just announced that its highly anticipated maXTouch mXT224 capacitive touchscreen controller chip is now ready for production release. Atmel representatives are positively bubbling with excitement about this product, which supports an unlimited number of simultaneous screen touches, looks out for unintentional touches and delivers smooth visuals with refresh rates of up to 250Hz - all on one tough, tiny, low-power chip.  Read More

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