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Children

— Medical

Computer vision enables researchers to screen earlier for autism

By - May 23, 2014 1 Picture
When experts look back over early home movies of babies later diagnosed with autism, they can see the early behavioral markers of the disorder. The average age of diagnosis, however, is 5 years old. The availability and cost of trained clinicians limits not just early awareness, but also research into autism on a large scale. At Duke University, researchers from different disciplines are using computer vision algorithms to make early diagnosis more likely, and even intend to create an app for parents to use at home. Read More
— Children

Osmo brings real world social play to the iPad

By - May 22, 2014 16 Pictures
Kids love tablet computers, whether it's filling yours with their apps, or having their very own. But no one likes seeing their little ones turned into screen zombies disengaged from the world, and people, around them. Osmo is an iPad gaming device which aims to bring real world and social play to the iPad, by transforming the space in front of the tablet into an interactive environment. Read More
— Science

New software accurately predicts what your children will look like as adults

By - April 11, 2014 6 Pictures
If you're a parent wondering what your child will look like as an adult, now you don't need to wonder anymore. Researchers at the University of Washington claim to have developed software that can accurately predict what a child will look like as an adult, up to the age of 80. The technique can even work from poorly lit photos, and could prove a big help in missing persons cases. Read More
— Children

Upsee allows disabled children to walk with their parents

By - April 3, 2014 3 Pictures
"Necessity is the mother of invention" – it's an adage that fits in perfectly with the story of Israeli mom Debby Elnatan. She was faced with the challenge of walking with her son Rotem, who has cerebral palsy and cannot use his legs by himself. Helping her two-year-old move around unaided proved to be a very difficult task, prompting Debby to search for a solution. Now, the system she created for him has become a commercial product that could improve the lives of children suffering from motor impairments around the world. Read More

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