more top stories »


— Children Review

Review: LeapFrog LeapTV educational games console

When should you introduce your child to a TV games console? I planned on waiting until my son was four to begin his console education. We'd start with old Atari titles from my childhood, before slowly working through classics from the likes of Sega and Nintendo and bringing him up-to-date. But that all went out of the window when we were sent the LeapFrog LeapTV games console to review. Read More
— Children

DynePod taps into the Internet of Toys

American startup Dynepic understands something every small child does: toys can, and do, talk to each other. And you can talk to them, too. Dynepic is aiming to develop an "Internet of Toys" architecture where toys and their controlling devices – the DynePods – are connected and controllable via an open source cloud system which can be programmed from an iPad. Read More
— Children Feature

The best toys for a tech-filled Christmas 2014

With the big day creeping up all too quickly, Gizmag takes a look at, and plays with, our pick of the tech toys which are set to be big hits this Christmas. With toys like the self-balancing MiP Robot and the interactive My Friend Cayla doll, along with devices including the VTech Innotab Max tablet and LeapTV games console, it appears that Santa is going decidedly high-tech this year. Read More
— 3D Printing

Polyes Q1 aims to be the first child-safe 3D sketching pen

Startup company Future Make 3D is developing the Polyes Q1, a 3D pen with a slew of safety features that aims to make it fun and safe for everyone – children included – to sketch out three-dimensional sculptures made of plastic. The cordless, USB-charged pen will come with standard, glow-in-the-dark, transparent and temperature-changing inks and is set to hit Kickstarter sometime next month. Read More
— Computers

Artificial intelligence program that learns like a child

Artificial intelligence programs may already be capable of specialized tasks like flying planes, winning Jeopardy, and giving you a hard time in your favorite video games, but even the most advanced offerings are no smarter than a typical four-year-old child when it comes to broader insights and comprehension. It makes sense, then, that researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed a program that imitates a child's cognitive development. Read More
— Good Thinking

Global Learning XPrize offers $15 million to tackle illiteracy in the developing world

Having tasked technologists with challenges as diverse as Ted Talkin' artificial intelligence and bringing Star Trek's iconic tricorder to life, XPrize has now turned its attention to an equally ambitious task. Millions of children around the globe don't have basic literacy skills, presenting a problem that cannot be solved without some big picture thinking. Launching today, the Global Learning XPrize offers US$15 million in prize money for the development of software that teaches children these vital skills in the space of 18 months, without the presence of a teacher. Read More