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Children


— Computers

Tynker introduces your kids to programming code either at home or at school

By - August 9, 2013 7 Pictures
The skills involved in programming are in many ways a lesson in life. Coding requires both logical and creative thinking which in turn leads to a greater ability to solve problems. Technology is shaping our world and our future and understanding computers and coding is an integral part of that future. Tynker, a California based education company aims to teach your kids programming using a visual platform and is targeting 8-14 year olds with a 16 week course that promises both fun and learning. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Quick Trainer to help toilet train autistic kids

By - August 1, 2013 3 Pictures
A new toilet-training device developed by researchers at the University of Rochester combines a wearable sensor pad, Bluetooth technology, an iOS device and accompanying app to help toilet train intellectually disabled children. Rather than just providing entertainment like the iPotty, the Quick Trainer issues an alert the moment the child starts to pee, so adults can take them to the toilet and encourage them to use it. If all goes well, they are rewarded with treats to encourage them to head to the toilet the next time the need arises. Read More
— Robotics

Children's art goes high tech with WaterColorBot

By - July 19, 2013 19 Pictures
Robots are already starting to make a mark on the adult art world with automated machines like the eDavid, which creates stunning painting in a variety of styles. But what about works at the other end of the artistic spectrum, like children's watercolors? Thanks to an invention from a 12 year-old, even young children can soon use robotics to make their own artwork. The WaterColorBot paints colorful pictures on paper based on existing graphics or follows along with users as they draw on a computer. Read More
— Children

Mosquito net-based DIY Storytelling Kits help families connect

By - July 19, 2013 19 Pictures
In an effort to bring parents and children living in poor communities closer together, Supaksirin Wongsilp has designed a toy that promotes interaction at one of the times and places families are sure to come together – bedtime inside the mosquito net. Her DIY Storytelling Kit lets parents narrate a story as they assemble story characters along with their children to hang inside the net. Instead of passively waiting to fall asleep, parents and kids get a little play time together that doesn't break up their routine. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Smart Diapers test chidren's urine to monitor their health over time

By - July 16, 2013 4 Pictures
Diapers usually rank very low on the list of items in need of a high-tech upgrade, despite products like the TweetPee recently hitting the market. But unlike a Twitter-enabled diaper, which provides information that anyone with a nose could figure out on their own, a new diaper from Pixie Scientific could actually warn parents of health issues before they become serious. The Smart Diaper uses several reactive agents and an app to monitor irregularities in an infant's urine over time and alerts parents if they need to visit a doctor. Read More
— Children

Sparkup Reader lets you record audio to your child's favorite books

By - July 14, 2013 3 Pictures
Picture books are a great way to encourage your kids to embrace and enjoy reading. But as an adult, there're only so many times you can read Aliens Love Underpants and remain sane. The Sparkup Magical Book Reader is a device which clips onto books and lets you record the audio for each page, so that your children can hear you reading it to them as they flick through the pages on their own. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Scientists developing a baby cry analyzer

By - July 12, 2013 1 Picture
Although Homer Simpson’s brother’s Baby Translator may still only be a whimsical concept, Rhode Island scientists have developed something that could prove to be even more valuable. Researchers at Brown University teamed up with faculty at Women & Infants Hospital, to create a computer tool that may find use detecting neurological or developmental problems in infants, by analyzing their cries. Read More
— Good Thinking

Lernstift digital pen uses vibrations to improve spelling and penmanship

By - July 12, 2013 9 Pictures
These days, we are so reliant on computers that many of us rarely pick up an actual pen or pencil and rely on auto-correct to fix our spelling mistakes. But Falk Wolsky and Daniel Kaesmacher think there's still a place in this modern world for good penmanship and correct spelling and have taken to Kickstarter to get their Lernstift (German for "learning pen"), which vibrates to indicate when the writer makes spelling mistakes or exhibits poor penmanship, into production. Read More
— Children

VTech InnoTab 3 wants to be your kid's first tablet

By - July 6, 2013 3 Pictures
The InnoTab 3 is the latest in the series of child-friendly tablets from VTech. Designed to be a portable and affordable introduction to tablet computing, it features a 4.3-inch touchscreen, a 2-megapixel rotating camera and 2 GB of onboard memory. As with many other kids tablets, the InnoTab 3 can also be used as an eBook reader, MP3 music player, photo viewer and video player. Read More
— Environment

Crowdfunded solar-powered classroom leaves the grid

By - July 5, 2013 3 Pictures
Aaron Sebens and his class of fourth-graders from the Central Park School for Children in Durham, North Carolina hit Kickstarter back in March to try and raise enough money for their classroom to go off-grid. A rather modest target of US$800 was smashed within a day by the kindness of the international community and, at campaign end, the kids found themselves with the handsome sum of $5,817 to spend on the purchase and installation of a roof-mounted solar energy harvesting system. A wind turbine was added to the shopping list, and just two months later, the 208ers threw a huge "Flip the Switch" party to celebrate leaving the grid. Sebens reports that the classroom has been running on renewables ever since. Read More
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