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Cells

Science

Frankenstein's simulated worm is alive?

The OpenWorm project is aimed at creating the first artificial lifeform – a bottom-up computer model of a millimeter-sized nemotode, one of the simplest known multicellular organisms. In an important step forward, OpenWorm researchers have completed the simulation of the nematode's 302 neurons and 95 muscle cells and their worm is wriggling around in fine form.Read More

Science

Cause of aging reversed in mice: Human trials may start next year

With the wide-ranging benefits of reducing disease and enabling a longer, healthier life, reversing the causes of aging is a major focus of much medical research. A joint project between the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia and Harvard Medical School that restored communication within animal cells has the potential to do just that, and maybe more. With the researchers hoping to begin human clinical trials in 2014, some major medical breakthroughs could be just around the corner.Read More

Medical

Scientists run eye cells through an inkjet printer

Imagine if conditions that presently cause blindness could be treated by simply by fabricating new tissue, and using it to replace the defective part of the retina. We may not be at that point yet, but we've definitely taken a step closer, thanks to research being conducted at the University of Cambridge. Scientists there have successfully used an inkjet printer to "print" rats' retinal cells onto a substrate, paving the way for the creation of custom-made eye-repair material.Read More

Medical

Hair, bone and soft tissue regrown in mice by enhancing cell metabolism

Anyone who has left youth behind them knows that bumps and scrapes don't heal as fast as they used to. But that could change with researchers at the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital finding a way to regrow hair, cartilage, bone, skin and other soft tissues in a mouse by reactivating a dormant gene called Lin28a. The discovery could lead to new treatments that provide adults with the regenerative powers they possessed when very young.Read More

Science

Cell Imaging competition showcases stunning microscopic images

We report on the latest developments in biological research all the time here at Gizmag, but it's easy to forget just how beautiful biology can appear when observed at the cellular level. On this note, GE Healthcare’s Life Sciences Cell Imaging Competition has announced its winners for 2012, giving us the opportunity to appreciate the images which will soon light up New York’s Times Square.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Filler makes old skin cells act young again

The latest development in the quest for eternal youth concerns that most visible sign of aging – the skin. Scientists at the University of Michigan (U-M) have found that it might be possible to slow the decline of aging tissue by focusing not on the cells but on the stuff that surrounds those cells. By adding more filler to the fiber-filled area around the cells, they were able to make the skin cells of senior citizens act like younger cells again. Read More

Science

Bi-Fi: New cell-to-cell communication process could revolutionize bioengineering

The internet has revolutionized global communications and now researchers at Standford University are looking to provide a similar boost to bioengineering with a new process dubbed “Bi-Fi.” The technology uses an innocuous virus called M13 to increase the complexity and amount of information that can be sent from cell to cell. The researchers say the Bi-Fi could help bioengineers create complex, multicellular communities that work together to carry out important biological functions.Read More

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