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Automotive

BMW techs using Google Glass in pre-series vehicle tests

Google Glass has had some bad press of late, with users called some very unkind names and some industry analysts calling it this decade's Segway, but BMW has some love for the wearable head-mounted display. At its plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina, BMW is running a pilot program to see how Google Glass can improve the quality control of its pre-series vehicles as they make the transition from prototype to full production.Read More
Automotive

Three-cylinder engines join the mix in updated Audi A1

Audi has sold over half a million of its A1 hatchbacks since the model's launch in 2010, so when it came to updating the small hatch, the German manufacturer hasn't messed with its winning formula. The updated A1 and A1 Sportback take their predecessors' sharp styling and add a pair of new three-cylinder engines into the mix. Read More

Automotive

New tech could allow electric cars' body panels to store energy

Imagine opening up an electric car and finding no batteries. An absent-minded factory worker or magic? Perhaps neither. If nanotechnology scientists led by the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) are on the right track, it may one day be a reality as cars are powered not by batteries, but their body panels – inside which are sandwiched a new breed of supercapacitors.Read More

Automotive

Crazy car creations of the 2014 SEMA Show

Gizmag spent the better part of last week touring the halls of the 2014 SEMA Show in Las Vegas. A bit of a change from your typical Paris or New York auto show, SEMA focuses in on components and accessories ... and the wild automobiles they create. It's a jungle of the flashy and impractical, with everything from pristine classics preparing for the auction block to outrageous one-offs that will never be seen again.Read More

Automotive

Drivebot provides real-time monitoring of vehicle health

For many drivers, a vehicle’s inner workings are akin to magic. When something goes wrong with the car, we take it to the mechanic and trust them to provide an accurate, honest resolution recommendation. But what if there was an app that could provide us vehicular simpletons with ongoing monitoring and recommend a non-biased solution when a problem is identified? That’s exactly what five Thai engineers thought when they set about developing the Drivebot, a device described as a Fitbit for your car.Read More

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