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Cardiac

Heart failure patients awaiting organ transplants normally find themselves anchored to the hospital bed by a washing machine-sized device that keeps blood pumping through their veins. But for Stan Larkin, a patient at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center, a new form of wearable technology is allowing him to keep on the move. The Freedom Driver is a compact, mobile version of the same machine that allows patients like Larkin to go about their normal lives while they wait for a matching donor heart to arrive. Read More
As our life spans increase, more services and care will be needed for the elderly, especially those who live independently. Technology clearly has an increasing role to play in improving home care and health monitoring. The latest developments from German research group Fraunhofer are a case in point. Read More
If there's anything we can take from the barrage of delivery drones to emerge recently, its that the technology has the potential to transport objects with unprecedented efficiency. Graduate student Alec Momont from Holland's Delft University of Technology is looking to tap into this ability to reduce emergency response times to cardiac arrest incidents. His Ambulance Drone prototype carries a defibrillator to the scene and promises to dramatically increase the rate of survival. Read More
Over the past few decades, cardiac pacemaker technology has improved to the point that pacemakers have become a commonplace medical implant that have helped improve or save the lives of many millions of people around the world. Unfortunately, the battery technology used to power these devices has not kept pace and the batteries need to be replaced on average every seven years, which requires further surgery. To address this problem, a group of researchers from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has developed a cardiac pacemaker that is powered semi-permanently by harnessing energy from the body's own muscles. Read More
Ordinarily, when doctors wish to monitor an ambulatory patient for heartbeat irregularities, they have them wear what is know as a Holter monitor. The device is fairly cumbersome, so it's usually worn for no more than 24 hours. A recent study, however, indicates that the relatively new ZIO Patch provides more accurate readings, while being considerably less obtrusive. Read More
Last Wednesday in Paris, a 75 year-old man received an artificial heart. That in itself might not be newsworthy, as such devices have been in use since the early 80s. In this case, however, the gadget in question was the first Carmat bioprosthetic artificial heart to ever be implanted in a human. According to its inventor, cardiac surgeon Alain Carpentier, it's the world's first self-regulating artificial heart. Read More
Although electrocardiograms (ECGs) can help predict cardiac emergencies as much as several months before a potentially life-threatening episode, this usually requires being hooked up to an ECG machine for a period of time at a doctor's office or hospital. A new sensor belt prototype allows an ECG to be recorded around the clock for up to six months, increasing the chances a problem will be discovered and treated before an emergency strikes. Read More
We've seen flying drones designed to deliver food and even beer on command, but a new autonomous aircraft from a non-profit organization in Germany could provide medical equipment to remote areas in an emergency. The Defikopter is a UAV that can be activated by a smartphone app to automatically take to the skies and drop a defibrillator to medical personnel on the ground, shaving precious seconds off of the time it takes for a person to receive treatment for cardiac arrest. Read More
New research demonstrates that triggering an out-of-body experience (OBE) could be as simple as getting a person to watch a video of themselves with their heartbeat projected onto it. According to the study, it's easy to trick the mind into thinking it belongs to an external body and manipulate a person's self-consciousness by externalizing the body's internal rhythms. The findings could lead to new treatments for people with perceptual disorders such as anorexia and could also help dieters too. Read More
Thanks to the miniaturization of electronics and wireless technology, detailed cardiovascular monitoring no longer requires a visit to the doctor's clinic or a hospital. A new wave of cardiovascular monitoring devices can be carried or worn by patients as they go about their daily routine, with the collected data able to be transmitted wirelessly to healthcare professionals and family members. Healthcare company Qardio has unveiled two such devices that allow patients suffering, or at risk of developing cardiovascular conditions, to better monitor their health. Read More
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