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Carbon Fiber


— Automotive

McLaren's P1 gets tested under the broiler in southern US states

McLaren’s P1 has already proven itself in Arctic exercises, but more recently it was the job of California, Nevada and Arizona to gang up on the supercar as part of an extreme heat testing scenario. The P1, which McLaren is set to begin delivering in a few weeks, appears to have remained undaunted as temperatures hit record highs of 116ºF (52ºC) during test runs in its new, undisguised finish. Read More
— Marine

Warning: these boards may contain (coco)nuts

A carbon fiber surfboard? Well yeah, you could buy one of those, but ... if that board is intended for use somewhere warm and sunny, then coconut husk fibers would be way more appropriate! As it turns out, they also offer an unmatched strength-to-weight ratio, they come from a natural and renewable source, and require less toxic epoxy resin in their construction. That’s why they’re used in Global Surf Industries’ line of Coco Mat surfboards and paddleboards. Read More
— Robotics

RHex robot shows off Parkour moves

Parkour is all about hurling yourself quickly and efficiently past whatever obstacles are in your path while maintaining as much momentum as possible. It's a challenge for humans, so how would robots fare? In an effort to push the boundaries of robotic agility, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania decided to find out by teaching their RHex robot some Parkour moves. Read More
— Around The Home

Splinter Works' Vessel takes bathing to new heights

If you asked people to name the most relaxing pieces of furniture they can think of, you'd probably have quite a few mentioning hammocks and bathtubs. So you might think that combining the two into one item should yield an exceptionally relaxing experience. That's just what UK-based design group Splinter Works is aiming for with its latest piece. Called the Vessel, it is a sleek-looking bathtub that is suspended in the air like a hammock. Read More
— Architecture

UltraRope could make kilometer-high elevators possible

As architects continue to design taller and taller buildings, a certain limitation of elevators is going to become more of a problem – using traditional steel lifting cables, they can’t go farther than 500 meters (1,640 ft) in one vertical run. Any higher, and the weight of all the cable required is simply too much. Currently in the world's few buildings that are over 500 meters tall, passengers must transfer from one elevator line to another, part way up. Thanks to a new lightweight material known as UltraRope, however, elevators should now be able to travel up to one kilometer (3,281 ft) continuously. Read More
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