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Cancer

— Medical

Modified Salmonella eats away at cancer, without a side order of food poisoning

By - April 15, 2015 1 Picture
Though generally a bacteria we'd associate with a severe bout of food poisoning, previous research has suggested that Salmonella needn't always bring bad news and stomach cramps. Certain strains have been shown to kill off cancer cells, but to use them as a form of treatment for humans without inducing any nasty side effects has so far proven difficult. But now, researchers have developed genetically modified salmonella that turns toxic only after it enters a tumor. Read More
— Medical

Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging

By - April 9, 2015 1 Picture
Our tissue's inability to repair itself as we grow older is thought to correlate with the decline in the presence of stem cells. So it follows that if stem cell function can be preserved beyond the norm, it could have implications for the aging process and adverse effects of tissue degeneration, such as cancer. Scientists from the University of Toronto have followed this line of thinking through research on the mammary glands of genetically modified mice, finding that development of the tissue can be manipulated to avoid the effects of aging. Read More
— Science

MIT's acoustic tumor cell sorting method is now up to 20 times faster

By - April 9, 2015 2 Pictures
A team of researchers from MIT, Pennsylvania State University and Carnegie Mellon University has announced key improvements to its acoustic wave-harnessing cell sorting method unveiled last year. The device, which is intended for use in the detection of cancer cells in the bloodstream, is now able to obtain accurate results from a patient sample in as little as five hours. Read More
— Medical

MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies

By - March 30, 2015 2 Pictures
While non-invasive imaging technologies, such as mammograms or CT scans, are capable of detecting tumors, identifying whether they are malignant or benign usually involves getting out the scalpel and conducting a biopsy. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a technique that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively detect cancerous cells, offering the potential of supplementing biopsies or maybe one day replacing them altogether. Read More
— Medical

Saccharin could sweeten the deal for cancer-fighting drugs

By - March 23, 2015 1 Picture
Whether it be advice from a dentist or preparing their body for beach season, there's a host of reasons people might reach for an artificial sweetener rather than sugar – though its cancer-fighting properties are unlikely to be one of them. But new research shows that the common sugar substitute known as saccharin could hamper the growth of particular cancers, with scientists claiming it could form the basis for new kinds of drug treatments. Read More
— Science

Graphene derivative interferes with seemingly invincible cancer stem cells

By - February 25, 2015 2 Pictures
While well known for its unique electromechanical properties, graphene may also prove key in preventing cancer tumor recurrence. A drawback of traditional cancer treatment with radiation and chemotherapy is that the primary developmental source of future tumors is not eradicated. Cancer stem cells, or CSCs, can survive treatment and give rise to recurring tumors, metatasis, and drug resistance after repeated treatments. Researchers from the University of Manchester and the University of Calabria have discovered that graphene oxides targets and neutralize CSCs in a manner that is not yet fully understood. Read More
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