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Cancer

Medical

Is exercise an effective cancer therapy?

While it's well-known that regular exercise can help you avoid getting cancer in the first place, researchers now believe that it could also be useful in actually combating the disease. An upcoming study led by University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) researchers aims to provide a more concrete answer to the question – can exercise really help fight cancer?Read More

Medical

Sensor detects signs of cancer, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's

Cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are all able to be better treated if detected early. Unfortunately, this is not always the case as symptoms may not appear until these diseases are well established. To help counteract this problem, scientists at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) in Brazil have created a biosensor capable of rapidly detecting molecules specifically linked to various cancers and neurological diseases.Read More

Medical

Taking control of key protein helps mice fend off cancer

The spread of cancer is a complex process, and for tumors to grow, the cells of the disease must first find tissue that'll let it thrive. We know that the disease prepares the tissue by acting upon a protein that suppresses the body's natural defences, clearing the way for tumor growth. Now, scientists have worked to take back control of the protein, restoring defences against cancer in laboratory mice.Read More

Medical

Pinpointed breast cancer genes explain why some cases are so hard to beat

Our understanding of breast cancer is almost constantly improving, and we're always researching new ways of detecting the disease. Now, a team of researchers led by scientists from the University of Cambridge has picked out a number of mutated genes linked to the cancer, only a small number of which were previously known. The improved understanding could lead to more efficient treatments down the line.Read More

Medical

Starving cancer cells of nutrients halts tumour growth

There are more than 900 different types of cancer currently identified, and many of them require very specific treatments, and can become resistant to chemotherapy as time goes on. Now, researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) have made a potentially huge breakthrough, working out how to cut off the supply of vital nutrients to cancer cells. The work opens the door to future treatments that could be less prone to resistance than many current methods, and could work across with a wide range of cancers.Read More

Medical

Tool matches cancer genetics to approved treatments

When treating cancer, it's difficult to know whether a chosen treatment is proving effective. While new breakthroughs may give doctors faster indications of whether drugs are working, by the time a new treatment is attempted, it might be too late to achieve a positive outcome. A new tool, developed by researchers at the University of Colorado, could have a big impact on which treatment doctors decide to use, using data from whole exome sequencing to pick out drugs likely to prove effective at tackling tumors on a case-by-case basis.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle "cluster bombs" could provide less toxic chemotherapy

Doctors have been using the chemotherapy drug cisplatin for decades, but significant toxic side effects – which can affect everything from the kidneys to the inner ear – limit its effectiveness as a treatment. A new method, which makes use of innovative nanoparticles, could change that, providing a "cluster bomb" approach to delivery that shows signs of being significantly less toxic to the patient.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle shows if cancer treatment is working, ASAP

Knowing whether a therapy is working effectively is extremely important when treating cancer. That information can have a big impact, potentially prompting a change in treatment and improving its outcome. Right now, we don't have a method of detecting whether a tumor is reacting to medication until numerous cycles of therapy have been completed, but research by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) could change that, with a new nanoparticle treatment providing the information in as little as eight hours.Read More

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