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Cancer

Medical

Secret behind success of breakaway cancer cells uncovered

A team of researchers, led by scientists at the Queen Mary University of London, has made a breakthrough in our understanding of how cancer cells are able to spread around the body and form deadly new tumors. The team found that two proteins work together, exhibiting an unusual behavior that helps keep the cells alive.Read More

Medical

Low-cost graphene-based biosensor chip detects DNA mutations in real time

One of the most common indicators of many diseases and cancer in blood is the presence of a genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Unfortunately, to date such tests for SNPs are slow, cumbersome and – above all – expensive. Now a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have developed a new graphene-based sensor that promises to deliver test results easily, in real time, and inexpensively. The researchers believe this could be a breakthrough in the early detection and screening for many life-threatening illnesses.Read More

Medical

Trained immune cells raise prospect of universal cancer vaccine

Engineering immune cells to attack cancer is a form of treatment that is showing great promise, but it is complex because it involves extracting and modifying T cells before injecting them back into the body. Scientists have now demonstrated a way to not just arm immune cells while still inside the body, but equip them with the ability to fight any kind of cancer, providing an early proof-of-concept for a cheap, universal vaccine for the deadly disease.Read More

Medical

3D hydrogel biochips offer better diagnosis of early-stage bowel cancer

Early detection is paramount to survival from bowel cancer, but doing so is difficult because most symptoms don't present until the cancer matures. Worse, existing diagnostic tests tend to be invasive and traumatic. Russian scientists hope to change this with a new biochip technology that can gather better, more precise data for diagnostic analysis. The scientists report that their new method far outstrips traditional methods of diagnosing bowel cancer. Read More

Medical

New cancer treatment targets sick cells only

Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for cancer but it also causes strong side effects and kills not only cancer cells, but healthy ones, too. In order to mitigate the damage this type of therapy causes to a person already ravaged by illness, a team of Brazilian researchers is working a new technique to deliver drugs with more precision, so healthy cells are more likely to be spared from chemical onslaught.Read More

Medical

Is exercise an effective cancer therapy?

While it's well-known that regular exercise can help you avoid getting cancer in the first place, researchers now believe that it could also be useful in actually combating the disease. An upcoming study led by University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) researchers aims to provide a more concrete answer to the question – can exercise really help fight cancer?Read More

Medical

Sensor detects signs of cancer, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's

Cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are all able to be better treated if detected early. Unfortunately, this is not always the case as symptoms may not appear until these diseases are well established. To help counteract this problem, scientists at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) in Brazil have created a biosensor capable of rapidly detecting molecules specifically linked to various cancers and neurological diseases.Read More

Medical

Taking control of key protein helps mice fend off cancer

The spread of cancer is a complex process, and for tumors to grow, the cells of the disease must first find tissue that'll let it thrive. We know that the disease prepares the tissue by acting upon a protein that suppresses the body's natural defences, clearing the way for tumor growth. Now, scientists have worked to take back control of the protein, restoring defences against cancer in laboratory mice.Read More

Medical

Pinpointed breast cancer genes explain why some cases are so hard to beat

Our understanding of breast cancer is almost constantly improving, and we're always researching new ways of detecting the disease. Now, a team of researchers led by scientists from the University of Cambridge has picked out a number of mutated genes linked to the cancer, only a small number of which were previously known. The improved understanding could lead to more efficient treatments down the line.Read More

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