Advertisement

Cameras

Digital Cameras

Ditching the lens enables superslim FlatCam that's thinner than a dime

Much has changed in camera design over the years, but snapping photos and shooting video still invariably requires a lens to capture light and focus on a subject. But if a camera could somehow replicate this process digitally, making relatively chunky lens attachments completely unnecessary, what would be left to look at? Well, going by new research underway at Rice University, not really much at all. Engineers have produced a functional camera that is thinner than a dime, raising the possibility of tiny, flexible versions that could one day be embedded in everything from your wallpaper to your credit card.Read More

Digital Cameras

Pulse lets you control camera settings from a smartphone

Pulse is a remote camera trigger for Canon and Nikon DSLRs which allows users to wirelessly control the shutter and adjust settings such as ISO, aperture and shutter speed from their smartphone. The device, which can also be used when shooting video or time-lapses, is currently on Kickstarter, where it exceeded its US$50,000 funding target in just three hours.Read More

Digital Cameras Review

Review: Pentax K-3 II offers useful new features

The Pentax K-3 II is the latest flagship DSLR from Ricoh and one which, on paper, offers a number of interesting upgrades over its predecessors. We recently spent a couple of weeks with the surprisingly compact DSLR to see if features including an enhanced in-body shake reduction and a Pixel Shift Resolution mode can help the camera compete with the likes of the Canon EOS 7D II and Nikon D7200.Read More

Electronics

HyperCam would let you see the unseen

Because regular cameras just process visible light, the images that they produce look like what we see with our own eyes. By contrast, hyperspectral cameras process additional wavelengths, showing us things that we wouldn't otherwise be able to see. Unfortunately, they also tend to be big, expensive, and thus limited to scientific or industrial applications. That could be about to change, however, as scientists from the University of Washington and Microsoft Research are creating a compact, inexpensive consumer hyperspectral camera. It may even find its way into your smartphone.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning

    Advertisement