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Bus


— Automotive

BYD to supply Amsterdam's Schiphol airport with all-electric bus fleet

By - July 22, 2013 2 Pictures
Chinese auto maker BYD has managed to fight off stiff competition from four other manufacturers to supply 35 of its electric buses to Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, one of Europe's busiest airports. Under the SUBSS Project (Sustainable Bus System of Schiphol), the single-deck e-buses will replace the airport's aging fleet of specialized gas-powered vehicles, and be used to quietly transfer passengers between terminals and aircraft. The new e-fleet is due to enter service this time next year. Read More
— Urban Transport

AutoTram Extra Grand carries 256 people

By - September 9, 2012 2 Pictures
Love them or hate them, bendy buses are impressive. You see one coming around a corner looking like an ordinary bus, then comes the articulated bit and then more bus. Now the unveiling in Dresden, Germany of the AutoTram Extra Grand raises the bar with a bendy bus that’s more like a bendy train. With three sections, measuring over 30 meters (100 ft) long and a passenger capacity of 256, it’s the world’s longest bus. Read More
— Good Thinking

GPS-enabled app helps the blind take the bus

By - June 21, 2012 3 Pictures
Like the rest of us, the blind can use speaking navigation apps to find their way around the city. A new Android application developed at Spain’s Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, however, is designed specifically to help blind people get to their destination by bus. Appropriately named OnTheBus, the app could also be used by the deaf, the cognitively-impaired, or anyone else. Read More
— Urban Transport

Could the go-go-gadget straddling bus be headed for the U.S.?

By - October 27, 2010 4 Pictures
The giant Straddling Bus we reported on earlier this year could be headed to the U.S. This week the inventor of the bus, Mr. Song Youzhou, announced that his Shenzhen-based company is aiming to form partnerships or licensing agreements with specialized manufacturers to build the vehicle for the American market. Designed as a way to reduce traffic snarls without the need for much in the way of new infrastructure, the “Elevated High-Speed Bus” straddles two lanes of traffic allowing cars to drive underneath. Read More
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