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Building and Construction


— Architecture

“Eco-Pak” expands on shipping container houses

By - June 12, 2012 7 Pictures
Thanks to their size, strength and ease of transport, shipping containers have been embraced by architects who have turned them into everything from restaurants and off-grid homes, to school classrooms and modular, portable hotels. The “Eco-Pak” home doesn’t just renovate the inside of a shipping container, but uses a shipping container as an integral part of a larger building, with all the structural components contained within it so it can be delivered just about anywhere in one convenient package. Read More
— Architecture

Yongsan Tower's "pulled apart" design maximizes sense of space

By - June 4, 2012 32 Pictures
Like the #-symbol-inspired skyscraper we looked at last month, REX's "Project R6," also known as Yongsan Tower, is a striking residential tower design commissioned by Dreamhub for its re-imagining of Seoul's Yongsan district. Central to the R6 concept is the claim that its unique, hollow, almost pulled-apart layout lends its compact apartments "generous views, daylight, and cross-ventilation," compensating for their modest size. Courtyards and roof terraces are intended to achieve a similar sense of community in R6 that Studio Liebeskind sought with its #-skyscraper design. Read More

"Cool blue" pigment could boost energy efficient building

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a new type of blue pigment that could help boost the energy efficiency of buildings. Discovered unexpectedly three years ago, the "cool blue" pigment has unusually high infrared heat reflectivity which it is hoped can be channeled into commercial products in the near future. Read More

Japanese 3way House features a 23-foot climbing wall and ladders

This creative family home features a series of climbing walls and ladders that guarantees to keep the family active. Located in a suburban area in Tokyo, the 3way House was created by Japanese studio Naf Architect & Design and offers an alternative to traditional family living. The structure resembles a modern Japanese family home with wooden flooring, kitchen and furnishings, however there is one obvious twist - do occupants take the stairs, ladder or wall to ascend? Read More
— Architecture

Brooklyn Botanical Garden Visitor Center features a 10,000 square foot living roof

The new Visitor Center at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens officially opened its doors earlier this month and was inaugurated with a ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor Bloomberg. Designed by the New York based architectural firm Weiss/Manfredi, the center merges modern architecture with landscape design that blends together Brooklyn’s urban and garden environments. Read More
— Architecture

Bizarre CCTV headquarters seems to defy gravity

Office buildings have traditionally been so staid that whimsical departures from the norm still trigger a strong response, both good and bad. The latest member of the avant-garde architecture club, the estimated US$1.08 billion, 44-floor, 768 ft (234 m) CCTV headquarters building in Beijing (already so iconic it's part of a board game for architecture groupies) is now finally complete - after nearly eight years of construction. Read More
— Architecture

Australian Hill House rides a wave of grass

Australian architect Andrew Maynard has come up with an unorthodox approach to capturing the sun in winter and excluding it in the summer. One of his latest creations, Hill House, is an urban family home in Melbourne that appears as if it is riding a wave of grass. The family home extension has been built upon the footprint of what once had been the back yard, without obstructing or losing the original building. Seemingly perched above a rolling hill, the new building faces the sun and the box-shaped structure above acts as a passive solar eave, cutting out summer sun, while letting the winter sun flood in. Read More
— Architecture

Korea plans hashtag-inspired skyscraper

The hashtag or "#" symbol has taken on a lot more use in recent years, especially with the rise of social media tools like Twitter, where it's used to highlight popular topics. So in a way, it's a fitting model for an apartment building designed to act as a self-contained neighborhood, which is exactly the idea behind the Cross # Towers planned for South Korea. Danish architectural firm, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is modeling the look of the proposed building after the familiar symbol, by placing two interlocking bridges between two skyscrapers, which will also support outdoor park areas to mimic the sort of spaces you'd normally find on the ground. Read More
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