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Building and Construction


— Architecture

Cruise terminal replaces Hong Kong's legendary Kai Tak Airport

By - June 16, 2013 11 Pictures
Flying into Hong Kong was once an aerial adventure as gigantic passenger planes made alarmingly steep descents over the harbor and then low over crowded high rises to runway 13. Those adrenalin-filled landings ended when the new Hong Kong International Airport to the west opened in 1998, however, the site of those dramatic flights has now been repurposed as the new Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. It was formally opened on June 12 as the Commissioner for Tourism, Mr Philip Yung, welcomed the inaugural berthing of the cruise ship Mariner of the Seas. Read More
— Science

Prefab houses could soon be taped together

By - June 13, 2013
Prefabricated houses are made up of separate pre-assembled modules that are joined to one another on-site – those modules, in turn, are made up of various wooden components that are typically nailed (or sometimes stapled) together in a factory. The wood used in the frames of the modules must be reasonably thick, in order not to split when the nails are driven in. This places some limitations on design possibilities. Now, however, German scientists have developed an alternative to those nails: electrically-activated adhesive tape. Read More
— Architecture

Porsche Design Tower elevator deposits car and driver inside their luxury apartment

By - June 3, 2013 16 Pictures
If you consider your car to be a work of art, then you can have it on display it in your living room ... if you live in one of the exclusive oceanfront apartments within Miami's Porsche Design Tower, that is. The Porsche Design brand has branched into architecture, and aims to give a new meaning to the term "drive in" by using three robotic elevators that deliver both the driver and their car right into the home. Read More
— Science

Bath University uses bacteria for self-healing concrete

By - June 3, 2013
You’d think that concrete would last forever. After all, it’s pourable stone, so it should hang around as long as the Rock of Gibraltar. But, under the right (or wrong) conditions, concrete decays with alarming speed. To combat this, researchers at the University of Bath in the UK are working on a self-healing concrete that uses bacteria to seal the cracks that lead to decay. In this way, they hope to cut down on maintenance costs and increase the life of concrete structures. Read More
— Architecture

Air Villa turns the Panamanian holiday retreat on its side

By - June 2, 2013 14 Pictures
Dutch studio Haiko Cornelissen Architecten has revealed a rethink of the typical Panamanian holiday home that breaks away from the current format by using sliding wooden doors that traverse the entire width of the building. To be located twenty minutes outside of the city in Cerro Azul, the sideways approach of the Air Villa design aims to provide an energy efficient dwelling with maximum exposure to the surrounding environment. Read More
— Robotics

SAM robot climbs highrises to check for damage

By - March 20, 2013 5 Pictures
If you were responsible for the upkeep of a 20-story-tall building, you wouldn’t just stand on the ground and look up at it to see if it needed any structural repairs. Instead you’d hire a building inspection service, which would lower inspectors down the side of the building on a swing stage or bosun chair, like window cleaners use. The folks at FTD Highrise Inspection, however, are now using something that they claim is a superior alternative – a highrise-inspecting robot they created, called SAM. Read More
— Architecture

Winners of the 2013 AIA New York Design Awards revealed

By - March 15, 2013 42 Pictures
Earlier this month, the recipients of the 2013 AIA (American Institute of Architects) New York Design Awards were announced. From hundreds of submissions, 42 winning projects were selected for their high quality work. Each submission scored merit for its use of innovative ideas, design quality, response to community needs and technique. The awards were open to architects and designers practicing in New York, or to New York-based projects, and spread across the categories of Interiors, Architecture, Projects, and Urban Design. Read More
— Architecture

Zero energy home uses 40,000 recycled plastic bottles for insulation

By - March 11, 2013 32 Pictures
Italian architectural firm Traverso-Vighy and the Department of Physics at the University of Padua have teamed up to create an innovative zero-energy home dubbed “Tvzeb.” Located in the woodlands a few kilometers from the historic center of Vicenza, the home combines the use of recycled materials, geothermal and solar energy generation, LED lighting and wall and roof insulation made from 40,000 recycled plastic bottles. Read More
— Architecture

Self-sustaining "farmscrapers" proposed for Shenzhen

By - March 8, 2013 36 Pictures
As one of the most densely populated cities in China, Shenzhen has been dealing with a sudden population boom for years now, leaving urban planners scrambling for innovative building designs that manage resources and space more efficiently. There have been a few unusual proposals, but the latest design from French architectural firm, Vincent Callebaut Architects, probably takes the cake. The group recently revealed its concept for "Asian Cairns," a series of six sustainable buildings that resemble a stack of pebbles and produce their own food. Read More
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