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Broadcast

— Telecommunications

Periscope turns any iPhone user into a live broadcaster

By - March 26, 2015 1 Picture
Not all that long ago, to call yourself a broadcaster you needed the blessing of station executives and a pretty smile. But communications technology is advancing so quickly that anybody with an internet connection can now share their perspective with the world. Twitter and Facebook brought this idea into the mainstream with text, photos and emails and now new players are arriving to take things in almost-scary new directions. Launched today, the Periscope live video app can turn anybody with an iPhone into a citizen journalist, whether they be streaming the scene of a disaster-zone or coming at you live from the breakfast table. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Buttkicker lets San Jose Sharks fans feel the game, from the bottom up

By - December 5, 2014 1 Picture
Watching a professional-league hockey game from front-row seats can be fairly intense, particularly when players crash into the boards right in front of you. Watching games on your TV at home isn't quite as exciting, although the San Jose Sharks, Comcast SportsNet California and The Guitammer Company want to change that. Using Guitammer's existing Buttkicker kit, they want to let home-viewing Sharks fans feel all the board hits through their couches. Read More
— Telecommunications

Sports broadcasts could soon feature Matrix-style replays

By - June 5, 2013 5 Pictures
Along with its nihilistic cyberpunk style, the film The Matrix is famous for popularizing what’s known as “bullet time” photography. You know the shots where someone would run and jump, then they’d freeze and the camera would appear to track around them as they were frozen in mid-air? That’s bullet-time. Now, that same technology may be coming to live televised sporting events. Read More
— Telecommunications

Ceefax says goodbye after 38 years

By - October 24, 2012 14 Pictures
The BBC’s Ceefax text service closed down yesterday after 38 years on the air. The world’s first teletext information service, Ceefax began broadcasting in 1974 and provided everyone from insomniacs to prime ministers with the latest headlines and sports scores at a time when the alternative was waiting for the next news broadcast. Now, as the BBC switches from analog to digital broadcasting, the low-resolution service has been retired for good. Read More

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