Advertisement
more top stories »

Bridge

Swaying this way saves energy while walking

Just two days after opening, The London Millennium Footbridge was closed to eliminate its sway. Turns out staying with the sway would have had its benefits, as researchers have found that it reduces the amount of energy expended when walking across the bridge. Read More
— Architecture

Architects envision Washington DC's first elevated park

By - September 16, 2014 7 Pictures
Four competing teams of architects have unveiled their proposals for what will become the first elevated park in Washington, DC . Measuring roughly the same length as three American Football fields placed end-to-end, the 11th Street Bridge Park project will be built upon the foundations of a former freeway bridge that spans the Anacostia River and serve the communities which lie either side. Read More
— Aircraft

Autonomous drones could be used to inspect bridges

By - August 19, 2014 1 Picture
When bridges are inspected for cracks and other defects that could lead to their collapse, engineers must either hang beneath those bridges on lines, or view them from elevated platforms. Whichever approach is used, a lot of setup is involved, and defects may get missed. In the future, however, unmanned aircraft may be able to more quickly and thoroughly check out bridges, working with wireless sensors built into the structures. Read More
— Science

Paint-on "sensing skin" is designed to detect damage in concrete structures

By - July 4, 2014 1 Picture
Although concrete structures such as bridges are now often built with strain sensors embedded within them, that certainly hasn't always been the case. In order to alert authorities to cracks developing within these older structures, one solution involves attaching sensors to them. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Eastern Finland are working on an alternative, however – an electrically-conductive paint-on "sensing skin." Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement