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Breathalyzer

— Health and Wellbeing Review

Review: Alcomate Revo brings pro-level alcohol screening to consumers

By - June 4, 2015 10 Pictures

Drunk driving is a serious problem and – despite being conscientious – at a certain point in the evening, trusting one's own judgement means trusting someone who isn't sober enough to make the call. While inexpensive breathalyzers costing less than US$30 are available, they're not the most reliable, while the more professional models need to be sent back to the factory on a regular basis for recalibration. Recently, we got hold of an AlcoMate Revo by AK GlobalTech. The device is aimed at the consumer market, and uses a replaceable sensor module that eliminates the need for recalibration. We put it through its paces.

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— Good Thinking

Sweat-analyzing AlcoStop system could thwart would-be drunk drivers

By - April 22, 2015 1 Picture
There are already in-vehicle systems that keep people from driving while intoxicated, although most of them require users to blow into a breathalyzer. The prototype AlcoStop system, however, takes a less intrusive approach – it measures users' blood alcohol levels by analyzing their sweat via built-in sensors, and won't allow the car to start if those levels indicate that they're too drunk to drive. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Floome pocket breathalyzer calls you a cab when you've had enough

If you're plans for a night out on the town involve the consumption of alcohol, it's probably a good idea to include strategies for getting home safely when the night is over. The Floome pocket breathalyzer for smartphones from Italian start-up 2045Tech is claimed to measure your blood alcohol content (BAC) with the same level of accuracy as those used by law enforcement. If the system decides that you're over the limit, there's an option to call a taxi. Read More

Face-scanning cameras could pick out drunks

People who are inebriated in public places (such as airliners or malls) can definitely create problems. Sometimes, though, it’s difficult to tell if someone really is under the influence. Instead of making every “jolly”-looking person take a breathalyzer test, Greek researchers are suggesting something less intrusive – video software that can spot drunks by analyzing their faces. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Sensordrone adds more sensory capabilities to smartphones

By - June 21, 2012 2 Pictures
Those who value having a myriad of information on the world around them right at their fingertips may have something extra to add to their Christmas or birthday wish list. Sensordrone, a Kickstarter project that has managed to triple its initial funding goal of US$25,000, packs a dozen environmental sensors into a keychain-sized dongle, collecting highly localized data and relaying the information to any Android device via Bluetooth. Read More
— Automotive Feature

France's bold drink driving legislation - every car to carry a breathalyzer

It is a great irony that alcohol has been almost universally legislated into becoming man's most commonly used recreational drug, as it's also the ONLY drug that causes more harm to others than to the user. This is most evident on our roads, where even in supposedly civilized first world countries with low road tolls, alcohol still accounts for between a third and a half of all road deaths and injuries. Now France is attempting a bold solution - from July of this year, it will become law in France to have a working breathalyzer in every car on the road. Don't laugh! The world is fast running out of tolerance for the road toll and tougher laws everywhere are inevitable. Read More
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