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— Computers Feature

Creative AI: Teaching computers to be reporters and storytellers

We humans are obsessed with storytelling. We tell stories to people we meet and people we love. We can't get enough of the stories that drive movies, video games, television, and books. We communicate with stories, and now we're training our computers to do the same. By writing sets of rules and instructions of varying complexity, artificial intelligence experts can enable computers to write stories both real and fictional. Some of these algorithms, as you'll see shortly, produce articles or reports with the sort of flair you'd think only a human could provide, which has fascinating implications for the future of publishing. Read More
— Mobile Technology Review

Review: Kobo Aura HD e-reader

A few months ago, we sat down to compare the top e-readers released in the past year and find out which would work best for our avid readers out there. Naturally, the latest Kindles and Nooks scored high marks, but surprisingly the one device that stood out was the Kobo Aura HD. Kobo isn't exactly the first name that comes to mind when people think of e-readers, but after spending some extensive hands-on time with the Aura HD, we see an argument for that to change. Read More
— Children

Sparkup Reader lets you record audio to your child's favorite books

Picture books are a great way to encourage your kids to embrace and enjoy reading. But as an adult, there're only so many times you can read Aliens Love Underpants and remain sane. The Sparkup Magical Book Reader is a device which clips onto books and lets you record the audio for each page, so that your children can hear you reading it to them as they flick through the pages on their own. Read More
— Computers

Professor's algorithm writes technical reports, romance novels could be next

Philip M. Parker, a marketing professor at INSEAD (the European Institute of Business Administration), has written and patented a system that uses an algorithm to automatically compile data into book form. Between his works and those of his research group (ICON Group International), he has over 900,000 books currently for sale on Amazon. More than a smart search engine, his system only requires a few minutes or a few hours to scan the databases relevant to any given topic and organize that data into a technical report. Next stop? Romance novels. Read More

Elegant angled bookshelf needs no bookends

Bookshelves have a basic design flaw. When books are neatly arranged for storage and display, they tend to tip over and lay on the shelf in confused disarray. This vexing problem has been solved by the Korea-based design group monocomplex, whose Lean/Bookshelf uses the force of gravity to keep things in order – no bookends required. Read More