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Battery


— Science

Sony demos paper-fueled battery

By - December 21, 2011 1 Picture
We've heard of gadgets being powered by some pretty crazy stuff, but how about paper? Sony recently showed off a new bio-cell battery that breaks down paper in order to create power. A paper battery sounds a little bit far-fetched, but the technology works, and could potentially change how we power devices in the future. So how does it work? The process starts with an enzyme suspended in water. When paper is dropped in, the enzyme starts to break it down and produce glucose that can then be harvested and used to power a battery. Sony described the break down process as similar to how a termite might eat and break down wood. Read More
— Electronics

Transparent and flexible lithium-ion battery developed

By - July 27, 2011 5 Pictures
There have been numerous attempts at designing partially transparent gadgets over the years, with the LG GD900 cell phone being a notable example. Fully translucent mobile devices are difficult to produce, however, as they would require a fully see-through battery, which hasn't been available yet. Stanford University researchers now claim to have developed such a device - a see-through, flexible, lithium-ion battery, suitable for powering mobile gadgets like cell phones, tablets or e-readers. Read More
— Electronics

iCruiser battery pack juices up mobile devices

By - July 5, 2011 4 Pictures
Smartphones, tablets and media players have helped to make our mobile existence so much more tolerable - but they all suffer from varying degrees of the same problem. Battery life is always a nagging concern for regular travelers, leading many to carry some form of external portable power source like the Juice Pack Powerstation we reviewed recently. Even though Mophie's external battery pack proved its worth in our tests, we may just have to trade it in for the New Trent iCruiser IMP1000 - which offers over three times the battery capacity in a similar-sized format and claims compatibility with almost every device in the market. Read More
— Science

New discovery might lead to laptops powered through typing

By - June 23, 2011 1 Picture
Everlasting batteries and self-powering portable electronics have come one step closer to reality, according to the results of a new research by Australian scientists from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT). The group of researchers successfully measured piezoelectric thin film’s capability to turn mechanical pressure into electricity. It may sound like an idea from the realm of science fiction, but the discovery could eventually lead to laptops powered through typing. Read More
— Environment

'Cambridge crude' could let EVs refuel like gas-powered vehicles

By - June 14, 2011 4 Pictures
With consumers used to the convenience of refueling their vehicle at the gas station in a few minutes, one of the biggest disadvantages of electric vehicles is the time it takes to recharge their batteries. Now, by separating the energy storage and energy discharging functions of the battery into separate physical structures, researchers at MIT have achieved a breakthrough that could allow EVs to be recharged in the same time it takes to refuel a conventional car. The technology could also provide an inexpensive alternative for energy storage for intermittent, renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. Read More
— Mobile Technology Review

Review: Mophie's Juice Pack Powerstation

By - May 30, 2011 2 Pictures
For the rest of 2011, I'm visiting a new country every week or two. I'm not the biggest fan of getting lost, asking for directions, or getting ripped off by taxi drivers, so keeping my iPhone's battery charged is high on my list of priorities. I came across Mophie's Juice Pack Powerstation while I was doing my pre-travel gadget shopping, and was surprised at how small, light and cheap the unit was. So how does it stack up? Read More
— Environment

New type of rechargeable battery – just add water

By - May 5, 2011 2 Pictures
Scientists at Stanford have developed a battery that uses nanotechnology to create electricity from the difference in salt content between fresh water and sea water. The researchers hope to use the technology to create power plants where fresh-water rivers flow into the ocean. The new "mixing entropy" battery alternately immerses its electrodes in river water and sea water to produce the electrical power. Read More
— Science

Discovery paves way for “optical battery” to generate solar power without solar cells

By - April 15, 2011 1 Picture
It has long been thought that, even though light has electric and magnetic components, the effects of the magnetic field are so weak that they could effectively be ignored. Now researchers at the University of Michigan (U-M) have discovered that under the right conditions, a light field can generate magnetic effects that are 100 million times stronger than previously expected. The researchers say the discovery paves the way for the creation of an "optical battery" that could harness power from the sun without the use of solar cells. Read More
— Medical

Battery-powered surgical lamp designed for developing nations

By - March 24, 2011 5 Pictures
While those of us living in First World countries may take an easily-accessible source of continuously-flowing electricity for granted, such is not the case in developing nations. Many communities have little or no electrical infrastructure, and experience frequent power outages. While people wishing to read a book in the evening could perhaps use a simple lighting device like the Solar Pebble, the matter becomes quite a bit more serious should the lights go out at a hospital, in the middle of an operation. Many hospitals have turned to using kerosene lanterns, but Australian industrial designer Michael O'Brien has created what he believes is a better alternative – a low-cost battery-powered LED surgical lamp. Read More
— Digital Cameras

GoPro releases Battery BacPac for HERO actioncam

By - March 2, 2011 6 Pictures
Just last month, GoPro introduced the long-awaited LCD screen module for its viewfinder-less HERO HD actioncam. At the time, the company stated that the module was the first in a series of BacPac accessories, designed to extend the capabilities of the 1080p high-def camera. Now, the next of those accessories has been released, in the form of the Battery BacPac. It allows an included 1100mAh lithium-ion battery to be mounted onto the back of the camera (which already has its own identical battery), potentially doubling its run time. Read More
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