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The BabyBeat computer system is being developed to prevent babies from falling victim to S...

According to the latest statistics, every year approximately 2,500 babies die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in the U.S. alone, with thousands more falling victim to it around the world. In typical cases, an infant passes away in their sleep, with no apparent explanation. While various theories have been put forward, the exact cause of SIDS is unknown. While not offering an answer to the mystery, two students from Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) are working on a computer system, that could keep more babies from becoming SIDS statistics.  Read More

The BARE baby bottle is designed to better emulate the shape, texture and functionality of...

Although conventional baby bottles are designed to mimic a mother’s breast, if they could talk, most babies – like the World Health Organization – would probably tell you they are a pretty poor substitute for the real thing. Now a New York mom has designed a new type of baby bottle dubbed BARE that is claimed to better emulate a mother’s breast in terms of shape, texture and movement, as well as providing the air-free storage and delivery of milk for your bundle of joy.  Read More

The BARE baby bottle is designed to better emulate the shape, texture and functionality of...

Although conventional baby bottles are designed to mimic a mother’s breast, if they could talk, most babies – like the World Health Organization – would probably tell you they are a pretty poor substitute for the real thing. Now a New York mom has designed a new type of baby bottle dubbed BARE that is claimed to better emulate a mother’s breast in terms of shape, texture and movement, as well as providing the air-free storage and delivery of milk for your bundle of joy.  Read More

The Infant Warmer is a sleeping bag-like device that uses a phase-change material to keep ...

According to the medical journal The Lancet, approximately 20 million low birth-weight and premature babies are born around the world every year. Of those, about 4 million die within four weeks. Many of those deaths take place because the infants can’t maintain a high enough body temperature on their own, and succumb to hypothermia. Incubators are designed to address this problem, but many hospitals in developing nations can’t afford them, nor can they provide the uninterrupted power supply that the machines require. The San Francisco non-profit group Embrace, however, is developing what could be an effective and affordable alternative – the Infant Warmer.  Read More

The Infant Warmer is a sleeping bag-like device that uses a phase-change material to keep ...

According to the medical journal The Lancet, approximately 20 million low birth-weight and premature babies are born around the world every year. Of those, about 4 million die within four weeks. Many of those deaths take place because the infants can’t maintain a high enough body temperature on their own, and succumb to hypothermia. Incubators are designed to address this problem, but many hospitals in developing nations can’t afford them, nor can they provide the uninterrupted power supply that the machines require. The San Francisco non-profit group Embrace, however, is developing what could be an effective and affordable alternative – the Infant Warmer.  Read More

Mommy Tummy is a pregnancy simulation suit, on display at Tokyo Make Meeting

One of the more popular exhibits at Tokyo Make Meeting this past weekend was Mommy Tummy, a pregnancy experience simulation system developed by Kosaka Laboratory of Kanazawa Technical College. It allows men (and others who have never carried a child) to not just feel what it's like to be pregnant, but to also gradually experience the changes. The Mommy Tummy suit is pumped full of water, and the onscreen display updates you as to how far along your pregnancy has progressed. The man's breasts will get bigger as well – did I just write that? – via a pair of inflatable balloons on the front.  Read More

The DuoFertility system discreetly monitors body temperature for subtle changes related to...

For an estimated one in six European couples, trying for a baby proves an often fruitless and frustrating process. Those wanting to avoid invasive techniques like in vitro fertilization (IVF) and opting for a more natural approach may find their lives being taken over by complicated calendar-based calculations or early morning toilet duties. UK-based Cambridge Temperature Concepts has developed a sophisticated body temperature measurement system which helps couples predict the best time to plan for a romantic evening, and is backed by a money-back guarantee. A wireless sensor stuck under the arm continuously monitors the minute changes in basal body temperature indicative of ovulation, and wirelessly sends the results to a hand-held reader which displays a six day optimum conception forecast.  Read More

Cheyenne Crow from Exmovere Holdings with child wearing Exmobaby pajamas (Photo: Liz Roll)...

Seems not even babies are safe from the advances in wearable technology. Nowadays, unborn children can tweet or listen to music and fully-fledged infants can wear a suit that changes color when they have a fever. The latest wearable concept is the Exmobaby sleep suit – a baby garment designed to monitor a baby’s heart rate, emotional state and activity level and to wirelessly relay the information to a cell phone or PC.  Read More

Cheyenne Crow from Exmovere Holdings with child wearing Exmobaby pajamas (Photo: Liz Roll)...

Seems not even babies are safe from the advances in wearable technology. Nowadays, unborn children can tweet or listen to music and fully-fledged infants can wear a suit that changes color when they have a fever. The latest wearable concept is the Exmobaby sleep suit – a baby garment designed to monitor a baby’s heart rate, emotional state and activity level and to wirelessly relay the information to a cell phone or PC.  Read More

The cervical ring and sensors used in the preterm labor detector

When a baby is born preterm – between 20 and 37 weeks – it can cause significant health risks for the child as well as emotional and financial hardship for the family. Until now, doctors have mostly relied on a external device attached to the abdomen to detect premature labor, but a new internal system - developed by Johns Hopkins graduates – could detect uterine contractions very early in the pregnancy which could assist doctors to prolong the pregnancy.  Read More

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