Advertisement
more top stories »

Australian Design Awards


— Good Thinking

Student-designed Solarball creates drinkable water

By - March 30, 2011 3 Pictures
When he set out on a trip to Cambodia in 2008, Industrial Design student Jonathan Liow had no idea it was going to be a life-changing experience. Upon seeing the poverty and poor living conditions in that country, however, he decided that he wanted to build things that could help people. After hearing about the need for cheap and effective water purification in Africa, he proceeded to create the Solarball for his graduate project at Australia's Monash University. The ball is reportedly capable of producing 3 liters (about 3 quarts) of drinkable water per day, using nothing but polluted water and sunlight. Read More
— Science

Study Nook gives special needs students added focus

By - February 18, 2010 4 Pictures
For certain school children with learning disabilities, focusing on the task at hand is a major challenge, especially with so many distractions to be found in the classroom. To address the problem university student Aaron Kowald has designed the Study Nook – a miniature desktop office that functions as a learning aid for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties (PMLD), like autism and Down's Syndrome. Read More
— Good Thinking

Kegless beer-in-a-bag keeps its bubbles

By - February 17, 2010 2 Pictures
The upside of a party at your place is that you don’t have to worry about getting a ride home after a few beers. The downside is having to clean up the next morning and finding a way to dispose of all those empty beer bottles. But had you supplied the party with (or encouraged others to bring) a Kegless, this wouldn’t be a problem. Kegless is a 4L (roughly 8.5 pints) bag-in-a-box packaging concept that provides a more sustainable alternative to conventional single-serve bottle or can. It allows beer (and other carbonated beverages) to be stored and dispensed from a single container while maintaining the carbonation and freshness of the product. Read More
— Bicycles

Regenerative Helmet for cyclists fits like a glove

By - February 15, 2010 4 Pictures
In many countries, wearing a bike helmet while cycling in public places is compulsory because it is proven to have saved lives. However, anyone who has ever applied one of these helmets to their heads knows that are definitely not a one-size-fits-all piece of equipment. An ill-fitting helmet means less protection, but they can require much trial and error to adjust correctly. The Regenerative Helmet overcomes this with its hard outer shell and flexible segments that allow the helmet to contort to provide a better fit. The liner uses dual density multi-impact foam to provide impact protection for both low and high speed accidents. Read More
— Electronics

The 13th Man lets you listen to televised sport in pubs and clubs

By - February 13, 2010 4 Pictures
Even if your lip-reading skills are first-rate (mine are absolute rubbish) you’ll still struggle to ever comfortably watch sport on TV in a pub or club if you can’t hear the commentary when the sound is either turned off because not everyone wants to listen, or it’s the audio of another sports channel you’re not watching, or the ambient noise of the venue is drowning out every word. Australian University of Technology student Tim McBride knows first-hand how frustrating it can be to sit down to watch your sporting heroes strut their stuff and not be able to closely follow the game. He invented The 13th Man (an extra, extra man in the game of cricket) that is a personal wireless speaker unit that sits atop your table and lets you listen to your favorite game. McBride’s invention is another shortlisted submission in our ongoing series of the Australian Design Awards - James Dyson Award 2010. Read More
— Bicycles

Firefly bike light detects traffic and lights you up for greater visibility

By - February 11, 2010 3 Pictures
Many people want to do their bit to help save the planet, or to simply get fit, by riding a bike instead of using their vehicle. However, traveling on the road when the sun goes down can be off-putting for fear of not being seen by motorists. The Firefly light has been designed to address this concern by making them more visible. It uses a passive Infrared sensor to detect traffic approaching from behind the rider and projects light from flashing LEDs onto the back of the rider with varying intensity depending on the proximity of the traffic. The Firefly light is another shortlisted design submission in our ongoing series of the Australian Design Awards - James Dyson Award 2010. Read More
— Automotive

The Bumpfree Dynamic Speedbump gives drivers a smooth ride

By - February 11, 2010 4 Pictures
The Bumpfree Dynamic Speed Bump concept could change the way drivers approach a speed deterrent in the future. It will allow drivers who are traveling at the right speed limit to pass over the bump without hindrance but will "remind" drivers traveling above the limit to slow down by creating the same feeling one gets when passing over a speed-bump - but without the usual speed-bump impact. Read More
— Good Thinking

First line of defense: AMATOYA fire reconnaissance vehicle concept

By - February 8, 2010 17 Pictures
Wildfire is one of the few natural disasters that we are at all equipped to combat, but when it takes a ferocious hold we are often able to do little more than limit the spread. Responding to a need for better equipment at the front line, AMATOYA is a concept fire reconnaissance buggy designed to improve vehicle and crew safety while maintaining off road capabilities and delivering better fire suppression technology in the critical initial response phase Read More
— Good Thinking

Squad positioning system helps fight fires and save lives

By - June 10, 2009 4 Pictures
Student designer Roy Hareguina's "Squad" is a compact indoor positioning system that enables fire fighters, even in dense smoke, to know their exact location and that of their colleagues at all times. Using a dual-mapping system, the tough polyetheretherketone (PEEK) units reduce the danger of separation and disorientation in high-rise buildings, and increase a fire fighter’s ability to save lives. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement