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Augmented Reality

Google's Project Glass hopes to deliver an augmented reality heads-up display

Google X (Google's futuristic technology development lab) has pulled back the curtain on Project Glass, its program to develop truly useful augmented reality "Google glasses." Project Glass aims to design and refine augmented reality technology to help a user explore and share their world armed with a wealth of relevant information - not at their fingertips, but rather at the end of their nose.  Read More

NASA Langley researcher Kevin Shelton wearing an early prototype (Credit: NASA Langley Res...

NASA has developed a pair of augmented reality glasses designed especially for commercial airline pilots to see during the worst visual conditions. The glasses include a heads-up display showing a virtual overlay of the runway and airport, head tracking technology, and voice controls - features that may help pilots keep their eyes where they're most needed.  Read More

A new app called Audioair promises to help users listen in to the silent screens that perv...

They're everywhere, when you think about it, the televisions. Screens are increasingly pervasive in public urban spaces - transmitting news, gossip, advertisements at us as we go. Usually they do so silently, not wishing to compete with the ambient drone of the city. What if it was possible to home in on a single screen and somehow hear what it had to say? Well apparently this is all possible now thanks to an iOS and Android app from the Airborne Media Group that it calls Audioair. It's a bold pitch, but what does the small print say?  Read More

The pistol grip can be detached to fit the AppTag's sensor and trigger to almost any toy g...

By now we've seen quite a few examples of augmented reality being used to let people zap virtual creatures in devices like the Nintendo 3DS and the appBlaster. Now John Atherton, inventor of the jaja stylus, is shaking up the concept by making the targets your friends and adding virtual collectibles and objectives into the mix. With his AppTag Laser Blaster attachment for smartphones, you'll be able to play first-person shooter games in the real world on any iOS or Android device, complete with virtual power-ups and other features usually reserved for console games.  Read More

Google's Android-powered glasses (NOT pictured) could provide a heads-up display to the we...

A number of anonymous Google employees are reporting that the company is currently developing Android-powered glasses that can provide a heads-up display to the wearer and connect over wireless data services. The glasses will purportedly work like a wearable version of the Google Goggles app, providing real time information on a user's location via GPS and motion sensors. Even more surprising, the same sources are saying these "Google glasses" could be available to the public by the end of this year.  Read More

The CAMDASS augmented reality system provides untrained personnel with instant medical kno...

Before we are able to download knowledge straight to our brains - Matrix style - gaining medical expertise will remain a slow and painful process. That's fine by most people, who can just go and visit a trained doctor. But what if you are a member of a small team of specialists operating at a remote, isolated location with no immediate access to medical resources? Then you either need to be a doctor, or you need the Computer Assisted Medical Diagnosis and Surgery System. Devised by the European Space Agency (ESA), the augmented reality-based CAMDASS aims to provide astronauts with instant medical know-how.  Read More

Visitors to the Live Park 4D World Tour wear RFID wristbands that allow the displays to id...

New media entertainment company, d'strict, is pushing the concept of virtual reality to a new level with the "Live Park 4D World Tour," a new theme park that recently opened in South Korea. The park is comprised of 65 different attractions over a 10,000 sq. foot (929 sq m) space, which houses several large interactive displays as well as some installation art pieces. Visitors wear RFID wristbands that allow the displays to identify them, while Kinect sensors detect their movements, voices, and faces. Many of the attractions center around having users create an avatar of themselves that they can interact with and take on a virtual adventure, which is portrayed using 3D video, holograms, and augmented reality technology.  Read More

The cover of Moosejaw's winter catalog

Here's an unlikely recipe for successfully spicing up a winter clothes catalog – make the models lose their clothes, or to be more exact, allow your clients to see what is hiding underneath the bulky winter garments. The X-Ray augmented reality app by clothing retailer Moosejaw does exactly that. It uses your mobile device's camera and some augmented reality trickery to grant you X-ray vision, as you scan both female and male models' bodies in the catalog. All you have to do is position your device over the catalog pages.  Read More

Sony transforms a room into a fantasy world using the Playstation Move and no post-product...

When Sony wanted to highlight the immersiveness of movies available on the Playstation Store, they turned to UK-based agencies Studio Output and Marshmallow Laser Feast to create a series of shorts around the theme "great films fill rooms." Using the Playstation Move, the production team shot a handful of scenes depicting an ordinary man going from his couch to flying above skyscrapers as a robot and fighting sea monsters. The best part: not a single aspect of these videos was added in the editing room.  Read More

Scientists have created a contact lens that can can project an image onto the wearer's ret...

Fans of the original film in the Terminator franchise will recall how various bits of data were shown to be overlaid on the cyborg's vision - in particular, they might remember the list of possible responses that could be used when someone was angrily knocking on its door (for those who don't remember, its chosen response wasn't very polite). Such augmented vision systems are now a little closer to reality, thanks to work being done by a team of scientists at the University of Washington and Aalto University, in Finland. They have created a contact lens that displays information, which is visible to the wearer.  Read More

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