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Athlete


— Sports

Iron-on motion capture system tracks baseballers' in-game biomechanics

There's much to be gained from tracking the biomechanics of elite athletes in the lab, where monitoring of stress on joints and muscles can not only aid in performance, but also help prevent injury. Baseball batters and pitchers dealing with one fastball after another are certainly no different, so US company Motus Global has announced an iron-on set of sensors designed to bring this technology out of the lab and onto the field for comprehensive in-match analysis.

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— Medical

Man-made ligament could replace ruptured ACLs

If you follow sports at all, then you've probably heard about athletes rupturing their ACL, or anterior cruciate ligament. It connects the femur to the tibia, and once it breaks, it's incapable of healing. Treatment most often involves reconstructing the ACL using grafts from the patellar tendon, which connects the patella (aka the kneecap) to the tibia – although this can present problems of its own. Now, scientists at Northwestern University in Illinois are creating a man-made replacement ACL, which could make treatment much more effective. Read More
— Sports

BSXinsight lactate threshold sensor lets athletes know how far to push themselves

Whether they're training or taking part in actual competitions, athletes have to maintain a delicate balance – they want to make sure that they're "giving it everything they've got," yet they don't want to push themselves to the point that they cramp up or drop from exhaustion. That's why the BSXinsight was created. Billed as being the world's first wearable lactate threshold sensor, it's made to let athletes know how close they're getting to the edge, so they can approach it but not go over. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

"Bruise trousers" are designed to let disabled athletes know when they're hurt

Along with the obvious mobility issues faced by athletes who are unable to walk, they also face another challenge – if they're unable to feel their legs, that means they can't always tell when they've been hurt. Severe bruises or broken bones can simply go unnoticed, until they develop into even more of a problem. That's why a group of students at Imperial College London have invented a set of "bruise trousers" that show such athletes when and where they've received a serious impact below the waist. Read More
— Sports

The physics of the world's fastest man

Usain Bolt is often described as the world's fastest man. The reigning Olympic champion in the 100-meter and 200-meter sprints as well as a member of the Olympic champion 4x100 meter relay team, Bolt is the first man to win six Olympic gold medals in sprinting, and is a five-time world champion. Long and lanky at 6 ft 5 in tall, he towers above the (mostly) much shorter sprinters. How has he managed to come out on top for the past five years? A team of physicists from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) has analyzed Bolt's past performances in the 100-meter sprint to understand what makes a record-breaker. Read More
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