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Armor


— Motorcycles

Bull-it Jeans' armored hoodie packs protection comparable to a set of leathers

Your standard hoodie couldn't really be classified as protective motorcycle gear, but the popularity of hoodies in general has led to manufacturers like Speed and Strength and Bilt making armored versions for motorcyclists. Bull-it Jeans can now be added to that list, but its armored hoodie uses a relatively new material called Covec, which was designed specifically for motorcycle apparel and has abrasion resistance that's better than Kevlar and as good as some leathers.

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— Military

Future Soldier Vision concept imagines the British soldier of 2025

What will the British infantry of 2025 look like? At the recent Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) exhibitions in London, Britain's Ministry of Defence (MOD) took the wraps off its Future Soldier Vision (FSV), which is the Ministry's vision of what the high-tech squaddie of the next decade will look like. Developed by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), the British Army, Kinneir Dufort, and SEA Ltd, the FSV is based on projections of today's commercial and military technology.

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— Aircraft

Could bomb-proof lining prevent another Lockerbie?

On December 21, 1988, a terrorist bomb detonated in the luggage hold of Pan Am flight 103 causing the 747 airliner to break up over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 243 passengers, 16 crew, and 11 people on the ground. To help prevent such a tragedy from occurring again, a European consortium, including the University of Sheffield, is developing Fly-Bag; a flexible fabric and composite liner capable of containing explosions inside an aircraft to improve its chances of survival.

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— Military

BAE System's CV90 armor vehicle uses F1 racing suspension technology

If Formula1 racers are thoroughbreds that need to pampered and cosseted, then armored combat vehicles are warhorses that need to stand up to the worst of the worst. That makes it a surprise when BAE Systems announces that it's taken an active damping suspension designed for F1 cars and adapted it for Sweden's Combat Vehicle 90 (CV90). Billed as a world's first for a tracked vehicle, the upgrade is claimed to improve battlefield speed and handling. Read More
— Science

Future soldiers may be wearing fish-inspired body armor

On most fish, their hard, overlapping scales provide considerable protection against pokes and cuts. Because those independently-moving scales are each attached to a flexible underlying skin, however, the fish are still able to easily twist and turn their bodies. Scientists from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and MIT are now attempting to copy that structure, to develop flexible-yet-effective armor for humans. Read More
— Military

Next generation armor inspired by animal scales

We've seen scientists examine everything from the structure of sea sponges to the clubbing ability of mantis shrimps in the search for next generation lightweight armor systems. Researchers at Northeastern University’s College of Engineering believe that fish scales could hold the key to creating armor that's both impervious and lightweight. They eventually aim to combine the properties of fish, snake and butterfly scales into a single protective armor system. Read More
— Military

Graphene could find use in lightweight ballistic body armor

While graphene is already known for being the world's strongest material, most studies have focused on its tensile strength – that's the maximum stress that it can withstand while being pulled or stretched, before failing. According to studies conducted at Houston's Rice University, however, its ability to absorb sudden impacts hadn't previously been thoroughly explored. As it turns out, the material is 10 times better than steel at dissipating kinetic energy. That could make it an excellent choice for lightweight ballistic body armor. Read More
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