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— Science

World's oldest digital computer restored to life at age 60

The Harwell Dekatron computer is a 1950s computer having roughly the weight and size of a Hummer H3 and the computing power of a four-function pocket calculator. Having been restored to its original operating condition using 95 percent original parts, it is now the oldest functioning programmable digital computer in the world. Guinness might have been onto something, when, in 1973, they named the Dekatron the Most Durable Computer in the World. Read More
— Computers

Old meets new in Steampunk Organ Command Desk

Bruce and Melanie Rosenbaum share a passion for Victorian high design but also enjoy all that modern technology has to offer. Happily both needs have been met by applying some Steampunk design principles to authentic or reproduction period furniture and appliances. The latest in an impressive line of projects to be completed by the couple has merged a reclaimed pipe organ with modern computer technology to produce the utterly gorgeous Victorian Organ Command Desk. Read More
— Aircraft

First flying car goes under the hammer

Putting aside jet packs, the other science fiction dream to perpetually elude us is the flying car. Gizmag is littered with stories on flying car inventions and yet my Toyota Camry is mournfully clipped, fused to the road while my dreams of zooming to work in the 21st century remain unrealized. But this is not a story about a new-fangled invention, this is a story about the pioneering forerunner to these zippy young upstarts; the ancient grandfather of flying automobiles, Frank Skroback's Flying Car, which recently went to auction in Atlanta, Georgia. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People Feature

Bonhams auctions remarkable collection of technology antiques – the Michael Bennett-Levy Early Technology Sale

The freight train progress of technology during the last century has masked the true value of landmark specimens of mankind’s technological triumphs. First-of-a-kind devices were quickly superseded and hence soon regarded as useless in comparison to newer, better equipment. Accordingly, we believe an auction to be held in London this week represents some of the finest medium-term investments we have ever seen, with a likelihood of their value increasing dramatically once historical perspective is restored. The auction includes 758 examples of almost all forms of early technology including many firsts – and the largest privately held collection of early televisions in the world. Read More