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Antenna

Telecommunications

World's smallest TV antenna gets the job done

Researchers have developed the world's smallest television antenna without having to compromise on reception or the conditions under which it can operate. The dual antenna created at the University of Morelos (UAEM) in Mexico receives analog TK and digital broadcast channels while measuring just 11 centimeters long, 6.5 cm wide, 6 mm thick and weighing only 12 grams (when coated, the weight reaches 80 grams).Read More

Mobile Technology Review

GoTenna review: Text and share your location anywhere, without a signal

Whether it be in the wilderness or at a crowded event, there is nothing more frustrating for many people than the dreaded no signal icon or "message not sent" being displayed on their smartphone display. GoTenna is a pen-sized Bluetooth device that is designed to keep your group connected to each other, even when there's no network around. We tried out a pair deep in the southern Rocky Mountains to see how they performed.Read More

Space

ESA puts 3D-printed satellite antenna to the test

We can't print entire satellites yet, but the 3D printing of major components is moving forward with ESA unveiling a prototype 3D-printed radio antenna. Currently undergoing testing at ESA's Compact Antenna Test Facility in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, it's the space agency's first 3D-printed dual-reflector antenna incorporating a corrugated feed horn and two reflectors.Read More

Telecommunications

Mitsubishi's SeaAerial turns fountains into antennae

When someone mentions a radio aerial, it tends to conjure up a vision of something made of steel and wire. But what about one made of water? On Thursday, the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation unveiled its SeaAerial, which uses a column of seawater sprayed into the air to create a radio transceiver antenna. Designed for use at sea or offshore, it's billed as the world's first seawater antenna capable of receiving digital terrestrial broadcasts.Read More

Physics

Image captures light as both wave and particle for very first time

In 1905, Albert Einstein provided an explanation of the photoelectric effect – that various metals emit electrons when light is shined on them – by suggesting that a beam of light is not simply a wave of electromagnetic radiation, but is also made up of discrete packets of energy called photons. Though a long accepted tenet in physics, no experiment has ever directly observed this wave/particle duality. Now, however, researchers at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland claim to have captured an image of this phenomenon for the first time ever.Read More

Science

Steerable optical nanoantennas light the way for practical lab-on-a-chip devices

Using unidirectional cubic nanoantennas to direct the output from nanoemitters, researchers at Monash University in Australia have described a method to accurately focus light at the nanoscale. The practical upshot of which is substantial progress towards guided, ultra-narrow beams needed for the new world of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and the eventual production of entire lab-on-a-chip devices. Read More

Electronics

Optical antenna may allow LEDs to replace lasers in host of devices

By applying 120 year old radio frequency antenna theory to the much newer field of photonics, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory claim to have produced a prototype optical antenna that increases the intensity of emission from a nanorod light source by more than 115 times. This technique may offer the opportunity to replace power-hungry lasers in short-range optical communications devices with enhanced low-power LEDs. Read More

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