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Animation

— Games Review

Review: Ni no Kuni: The Wrath of the White Witch (PS3)

By - April 19, 2013 30 Pictures
In a rare and brilliant move, Akihiro Hino (president of Japanese game developer Level-5) somehow convinced Studio Ghibli – Japan's most respected animation studio – to collaborate on a new video game. Even if Studio Ghibli's Oscar-winning director Hayao Miyazaki has been a vocal critic of the medium (nixing the possibility of his films being adapted to game consoles), and was not directly involved with Level-5's Ni no Kuni, it seems some of his magic still managed to rub off on it. Read More
— Science

New animation tech could make motion capture suits obsolete

By - March 27, 2013 4 Pictures
Actors may soon say good-bye to those humbling Lycra body suits commonly used in the visual effects industry, thanks to a group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (MPII). They've formed a start-up called The Captury that is set to deliver its proprietary markerless motion capture software later this year. Their software can even capture a costume's surface detail in three dimensions, like the draping folds in a ballroom dress. Read More
— Games

AMD's TressFX Hair gives game characters lovely locks

By - February 26, 2013 10 Pictures
The problems associated with rendering realistic hair has held video games back for years. When Nintendo first created the sprite for Mario in the original Donkey Kong, it gave him a hat because it was too difficult to animate his hair. When video games made the leap into the world of real-time 3D graphics, things didn't get much better. Today AMD is officially unveiling its solution, TressFX Hair, that will significantly improve the look of virtual hair beginning with the new Tomb Raider. Read More
— Children

Pas a Pas: A stop-motion animation tool for the classroom

By - November 23, 2012 20 Pictures
Ishac Bertran's Pas a Pas is not only a device for teaching children the fundamentals of stop-motion animation (and a little geometry for good measure); it also happens to be a gorgeous piece of product design (which, Gizmag guesses, is with good reason). All in, it's a welcome reminder that sometimes all that compelling new technology requires is a little original thought. Read More
— Home Entertainment

FlipBooKit thinks moving images inside the box

By - October 25, 2012 1 Picture
Fans of traditional flipbooks now have the opportunity to indulge their passion for miniature motion pictures with a new device being developed in Los Angeles, in the U.S. FlipBooKit, currently on the top fund raisers on KickStarter’s art projects, is a contemporary version of XIX century devices designed to create the illusion of movement. It is the brainchild of multi-media talent team Mark Rosen and Wendy Marvel. Read More
— Science

Software converts video game characters into physical 3D models

By - July 31, 2012 3 Pictures
Take a look at all the Portal toys that are currently available, and you’ll realize just how much gamers like to own physical models of the digital characters that they know so well. When it comes to characters that are really physically “weird,” though, there can be a problem – goofy anatomy that works in a computer-generated world may not work in the real world. In other words, a physical model of a monster from a video game may be too top-heavy to stand up on its own, its arms may positioned in such a way that they can’t bend properly, or it may otherwise just be plain ol’ gimped. However, new software has been designed to solve those problems – it takes any three-dimensional computer character, and then uses a 3D printer to create a fully-assembled articulated figure based on it. Read More
— Games

Valve hands over its own movie-making tools to gamers

By - July 3, 2012 1 Picture
Valve has gained a reputation over the years not just for consistently putting out great games, but also for the slick trailers and promo videos that go along with them. But now the developer is turning the tables and handing over its own video-making tools to fans free of charge. With the Source Filmmaker, gamers will be able to direct, animate, and record their own videos as if they were shooting on location inside a video game. Read More
— Games

Stunning "Agni's Philosophy" tech demo shows the future of Final Fantasy

Every E3 brings a fresh crop of video game trailers, each with more impressive visuals than the last. A new tech demo from Square Enix however may have blown them all out of the water in terms of graphics, and even give the KARA demo from a few months back some competition. The demo, titled Agni's Philosophy, was created with a new engine from Luminous Studios that depicts real-time graphics on par with pre-rendered CGI and will likely be used in a future installment of the acclaimed Final Fantasy series. Read More
— Good Thinking

Hi-tech Qumarion mannequin gives character animation a welcome boost

Comic book artists and animators often use posable mannequins or motion capture to help get tricky action postures just right, but transferring the figures to paper or computer screens still involves drawing or learning complicated animation and mo-cap software, not to mention all the cameras, hardware and people in funny suits running around. Last year, we reported on the efforts of a Japanese consortium to create what is essentially an action figure equipped with sensors at several joints that would allow real-time pose generation of on-screen CG characters. Still in development then, it's now called Qumarion and when it hits the market in a few months, it'll no doubt prove to be a major time saver for artists and animators alike. Read More
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