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A close up of a deathly lady (Photo: Bitbangerlabs)

What if creating the illusion of a ghost walking next to you was as simple as waving a light stick in front of a camera? Pixelstick is a new light painting tool developed by Brooklyn-based Bitbangerlabs, that allows anyone to create incredible images with the aid of a camera set to take long exposure photographs. Capable of reading images created in any image editing software, the digital light rod displays the desired image a line at a time, letting you create visuals in real world settings that can feature anything from floating graffiti to video game characters, blinking heads or brilliant swirls of color.  Read More

The Giphoscope brings animated GIFs to the physical world

What happens when old meets slightly less old? You end up with a product that brings animated GIFs out of the computer monitor and into the 3D world. We actually just covered Gifpop, a product that uses lenticular printing to bring GIFs out, and now the Giphoscope does something similar, but with a hand crank instead.  Read More

Gifpop allows users to print short animated GIF cards

Animated GIFs are not exactly a new piece of technology, having been introduced in 1987. Lenticular printing is a technology even older, as it starter back in the 1940s. So what happens when you take these two older technologies and merge them? You end up with Gifpop, a new service designed to let people print any animated GIF from the web.  Read More

Concept image showing Orion spacecraft approaching the robotic asteroid capture vehicle (I...

NASA has released new concept images and animations outlining one version of its plan to capture an asteroid with an unmanned craft and return it to lunar orbit for astronauts to study. The plan is part of an initiative by President Barack Obama for a US manned asteroid mission as outlined in his 2014 NASA budget request. The agency’s main objective at the moment is to come up with alternative approaches and evaluate them.  Read More

Hachiya is currently exhibiting the M-02J glider at the 3331 Arts Chiyoda center in Japan

In the Japanese animated film, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, the protagonist explores a post-apocalyptic world riding on a jet-powered glider called a Möwe. When the movie was first released in 1984, a vehicle like that seemed like it could only exist in science fiction, but today one artist is determined to make it a reality. Kazuhiko Hachiya has spent the past decade designing and testing his own single-person glider and recently unveiled a full-sized model with a working jet engine.  Read More

The Monkey Light Pro in action

There are plenty of interesting ways to deck out your bicycle, but MonkeyLectric may have come up with the ultimate way to make it stand out on the road. The company's new Monkey Light Pro is a set of LED bars that attach to a bicycle wheel and can be programmed to play colorful animations.  Read More

The Hyperion lamp (Photo: Paul Heijnen)

There aren't enough stop motion animation films starring light fittings, in my opinion. Until today, I only knew of one: Luxo Jr, by Pixar. Hyperion is the second, and it stars the eponymous insectoid light fitting, designed by Paul Heijnen.  Read More

A frame from 'A Boy and His Atom'

Anyone who’s tried their hand at stop animation will know it’s an incredibly time consuming and delicate job. But spare a thought for scientists at IBM Almaden in California who have produced the world’s smallest stop animation movie by using a scanning tunneling microscope to move individual atoms. Rather than competing with Aardman or Pixar for a slice of the international box office, the film is intended to make the public aware of new technology that could increase computer memories far beyond what is possible today.  Read More

Level-5's Ni no Kuni: The Wrath of the White Witch successfully recreates the hand-drawn l...

In a rare and brilliant move, Akihiro Hino (president of Japanese game developer Level-5) somehow convinced Studio Ghibli – Japan's most respected animation studio – to collaborate on a new video game. Even if Studio Ghibli's Oscar-winning director Hayao Miyazaki has been a vocal critic of the medium (nixing the possibility of his films being adapted to game consoles), and was not directly involved with Level-5's Ni no Kuni, it seems some of his magic still managed to rub off on it.  Read More

The quick body movements of sparring martial artists are tracked by The Captury's software...

Actors may soon say good-bye to those humbling Lycra body suits commonly used in the visual effects industry, thanks to a group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (MPII). They've formed a start-up called The Captury that is set to deliver its proprietary markerless motion capture software later this year. Their software can even capture a costume's surface detail in three dimensions, like the draping folds in a ballroom dress.  Read More

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