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Alzheimer's Disease

— Medical

Scientists take a significant step towards an early warning blood test for Alzheimer's

By - July 10, 2014 1 Picture
An international collaboration of scientists led by King's College London (KCL) and Proteome Sciences plc has identified a combination of 10 proteins found in human blood cells which may lead to an accurate early warning test for Alzheimer's. An increased ability to detect this debilitating disease at an early stage has the potential to greatly improve quality of life and may even lead to new clinical trials developing new avenues of treatment designed to stop the disease in its tracks. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New blood test predicts onset of Alzheimer's disease with 90% accuracy

By - March 9, 2014 1 Picture
US medical researchers have developed a blood test which predicts with 90 percent accuracy if an individual will develop Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment within three years. The test, which looks for a set of ten lipid markers, will allow treatments to be sought that may be effective during this early, asymptomatic stage of the disease. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Compound in fruits and vegetables prevents symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mice

By - March 9, 2014 1 Picture
Alzheimer's disease represents the most common form of dementia, with the early stages of the disease generally characterized with short term memory loss and learning difficulties that increase in severity as the patient progresses in age. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California, have discovered that with regular treatments of the antioxidant fisetin, they were able to prevent memory loss in mice with genetic mutations linked to Alzheimer's. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Drugs to fix "misfolded" proteins could cure a range of diseases

By - December 9, 2013 1 Picture
Proteins adopt their functional three-dimensional structure by the folding of a linear chain of amino acids. Gene mutation can cause this folding process to go awry, resulting in "misfolded" proteins that are inactive or, in worse cases, exhibit modified or toxic functionality. This is the cause of a wide range of diseases, but researchers have developed a technique that fixes these misfolded proteins, allowing them to perform their intended function, thereby providing a potential cure for a number of diseases. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Discovery shines a light on potential cure for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

By - November 4, 2013 1 Picture
It is generally believed that aggregations of proteins are responsible for brain disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the difficulty has been in detecting the aggregates responsible and removing them from the brain. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and Polish Wroclaw University of Technology have found a potential solution using lasers. Read More
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