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Active Shutter

— Games

NVIDIA unveils bigger and brighter 3D Vision 2 displays and glasses

By - October 17, 2011 6 Pictures
While the latest 3D TV revolution has had a slow start, the use of 3D technology for video games has proven more popular with over 600 3D-supported games currently available on the PC. However, one of the big downsides 3D gaming solutions, such as NVIDIA’s 3D Vision, share with 3D TV is the noticeably dimmer image that results from wearing active shutter glasses. NVIDIA has now updated its 3D gaming technology with the unveiling of 3D Vision 2, that uses a new technology called NVIDIA 3D LightBoost that is claimed to increase the brightness of 3D images by up to two times. Read More
— Computers

ViewSonic packs 3D emitter in new 24-inch monitor

By - May 31, 2011 1 Picture
ViewSonic chose Computex 2011 to unveil its new 24-inch monitor which boasts a built-in 3D emitter. With 3D gaming seen by many as the best use for 3D technology it's a little surprising we haven't seen a the release of 3D monitors to rival the numbers of 3D TVs hitting the market. Nevertheless, ViewSonic is claiming its V3D245wm-LED is the first 24-inch smart monitor sporting an integrated 3D emitter to support active shutter 3D glasses. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Panasonic and XPAND look to create universal standard for active-shutter 3D glasses

By - March 29, 2011 1 Picture
When a new technology comes on the scene it often sparks a format war. It's logical that the big players will push their proprietary technology as the market standard so they can recoup some of the money they've spent on R & D. It happened with Beta and VHS, HD-DVD and Blu-ray and more recently with active-shutter glasses for 3D TVs. Now Panasonic has teamed up with XPAND, the company behind a line of Universal 3D glasses, to create a new "universal standard" for 3D active-shutter glasses called M-3DI. But although there are a few companies on board, a number of big players are yet to sign up. Read More
— Computers

MSI set to release world’s first 3D multi-touch all-in-one PC

By - September 14, 2010 6 Pictures
In April, NEC announced plans to release a 3D all-in-one (AIO) desktop PC sometime this year. They were probably hoping to lay claim to being the first company to bring such a product to the market but they’ve been beaten to the punch by MSI, who is set to release its Wind Top AE2420 3D AIO PC that also boasts a touchscreen and is also the first AIO PC to feature USB 3.0 ports. Sporting a 24-inch Full HD (1080p) multi-touch display comprising a 120Hz LED panel, the AE2420 3D comes with one pair of rechargeable wireless active shutter glasses and 2D to 3D conversion capabilities. Read More
— Computers

NVIDIA 3D Vision Pro has professional market in its stereoscopic sights

By - July 28, 2010 2 Pictures
It seems that barely a day goes by without some new 3D product hitting the shelves. With 3D technology having obvious applications for engineers, designers, architects and computational chemists it’s not surprising to see NVIDIA is set to bring out a new 3D stereoscopic solution aimed at just these markets. The company’s 3D Vision Pro brings true stereo 3D to the desktop along with support for LCD panels to offer a practical way to provide a 3D viewing experience for large scale visualization environments like video walls and collaborative virtual environments (CAVEs). Read More
— Home Entertainment

LG introduces new Infinia 3D-capable HDTVs and Blu-ray player

By - July 15, 2010 3 Pictures
LG may have been beaten to the 3D TV punch by the likes of Samsung, Sony and Panasonic but the Korean manufacturer has still managed to claim a first with its new Infinia HDTVs – namely the world’s first Full LED 3D HDTV. This seems to be splitting hairs a bit as both Samsung and Sony offer 3D TVs in edge LED backlit flavors, but LG’s new LX9500 series are the first with LED backlighting that supports localized dimming for improved contrast and blacker blacks. LG’s entry into the 3D market also sees the release of the edge backlit LX6500 series and the company’s first 3D-capable Network Blu-ray player. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Toshiba develops low crosstalk 3D glasses

By - May 20, 2010 1 Picture
Aside from the obvious fashion concerns arising from donning 3D glasses (which is already being addressed with the release of designer 3D eyewear) the biggest drawback of active shutter glasses is crosstalk. This refers to the ghosting of images when the right eye sees some residue of the image intended for the left eye and vice versa. Toshiba has now developed new high-response LCD panels that can be used in active shutter glasses to reduce crosstalk. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Designer 3D glasses for the fashion conscious

By - May 13, 2010 3 Pictures
A chance meeting at 35,000ft some three years ago between a movie studio executive and a Polaroid eyewear product development manager has resulted in the first Designer 3D collection of frames that are RealD approved and certified (RealD technology is used in most 3D applications). During an international flight, Rhett Adam from Look 3D Eyewear was given a “heads-up” by a studio exec about the impending 3D onslaught and quickly identified a new market. By the time he’d landed in his native Australia, the then 35-year-old had put in place plans to quit his job and embark on a new adventure. From those humble beginnings, Look 3D Eyewear was born and the company now has four series of passive 3D viewing glasses that come in a huge variety of styles. Say goodbye to looking like a nerd while viewing 3D content. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Simple solution turns 3D TV glasses incompatibility on its head

By - May 6, 2010 1 Picture
Although 3D TV manufacturers are playing nicely by agreeing to a standard 3D Blu-ray format, they’ve unfortunately clung to their proprietary ways for active shutter glasses needed to view 3D TV images. This means anyone who shells out for a new 3D TV isn’t able to take their glasses to a friend’s home to watch their 3D TV unless it is the same brand. But the folks at Home Cinema Choice have stumbled across an easy – albeit less than comfortable – solution. Just turn the glasses upside down. Read More
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