Decision time? Check out our latest product comparisons

3D Printing

Exploded view of the CubeSat-class 50-mm (2-in) imaging instrument (Image: NASA Goddard/Ja...

Telescopes are very simple devices in theory, but getting one to work in space means a complex assembly of mechanical parts that is expensive, difficult to build, and hard to operate in the hostile environment outside the Earth’s atmosphere. To simplify things, NASA aerospace engineer Jason Budinoff is working on the first space telescope made entirely from 3D-printed parts.  Read More

The Mars Odyssey spacecraft is one of the 3D-printable models made available by NASA

If you have access to a 3D printer, then you can build your own space fleet courtesy of NASA – provided you don’t mind spacecraft that are plastic and four inches long. As part of its continuing program of education and outreach, the space agency has released 22 printable models of NASA and European space probes, asteroids, and planetary landscapes for the hobbyist and space enthusiast.  Read More

Olaf Diegel's prototype 3D-printed alto sax

While attending Euromold 2013 in Frankfurt, Germany, last December with a band playing 3D-printed instruments, Olaf Diegel was set a challenge by the head of 3D Systems, Avi Reichental. The Professor of product development at Lund University, Sweden was given the task of creating a 3D-printed working saxophone. The first ODD prototype was revealed last week in a short demonstration video, which you can see after the jump.  Read More

The Tourbillon 1000%

Buying a mechanical watch with a finely-crafted tourbillon movement can set you back tens, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars, but if you don’t mind one made out of plastic and a bit larger than usual, 3D printing may be the answer. Computer scientist and watchmaking enthusiast Nicholas Manousos has created a printable version of the famous watch movement called Tourbillon 1000%. Fabricated from thermoplastic and ball bearings, it may not be practical, but it's certainly eye catching.  Read More

Amazon has announced the launch of its 3D Printed Products store, at which shoppers can cu...

Amazon has announced a new 3D Printed Products store. The store has launched with more than 200 print-on-demand designs. Users can customize items like earrings, pendants, rings and bobble head dolls using a special widget, before having the item 3D-printed and delivered.  Read More

Customers will get to choose from four types of OwnPhones, though thousands of different d...

Like many music lovers on the move, OwnPhones founder and CEO Itamar Jobani became frustrated when his off-the-shelf earphones kept falling out during sporty activity. He gathered a team of expert programmers, electronics engineers, 3D modelers and industrial designers and launched a new effort to develop custom-fit wireless earphones. The tailored personal audio throwers will range from simple plugs that stay put when you're out for a run to ornate jewelry that's sure to create an impression.  Read More

The popular My Little Pony line has been customized by a hand-picked selection of 3D artis...

While Hasbro's existing catalog is already brimming with toys for childhood recreation, it has just announced an initiative that could bring a new level of personalization to playtime. Joining forces with 3D-printing marketplace Shapeways, the company has launched SuperFanArt, a site that lets fans design and print toys based on Hasbro's much-loved product range.  Read More

Recent surgery using a 3D-printed spine cage has been hailed a success

While the impacts of 3D printing are indeed far-reaching, the medical industry stands to gain as much as any from this fast-growing technology. Following in the footsteps of patient-specific surgeries and treatments such as skull and jaw implants, as well as custom-molded mouthpieces for sufferers of sleep apnea is the first spinal fusion surgery performed using a 3D-printed spine cage.  Read More

Monash University's Michelle Quayle shows off part of the Printed Anatomy Series kit

While we might not hear much about a "worldwide shortage of cadavers," the fact is that in developing nations and other places, they are in short supply. It costs money to properly embalm and otherwise prepare the bodies, plus they need to be kept refrigerated, and they can only be dissected under strictly-regulated conditions. A team from Australia's Monash University, however, has developed what could be the next-best thing – highly-realistic 3D-printed cadaver body parts.  Read More

A Berlin coder has built a system that lets you custom design your own sex toy, and have a...

The rise of 3D printing means, among other things, that you'll never again have to settle for a sex toy that doesn't hit all the right spots. This fun, and exceptionally geeky, website lets you use bezier curves and other fun parameters to build your own perfect fit ... and a bunch of other designs that are unlikely to fit anywhere, ever.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 29,042 articles