Advertisement
more top stories »

3D TVs

— Home Entertainment

Sharp debuts AQUOS four primary color 3-D televisions

By - May 31, 2010 4 Pictures
Sharp is set to unleash its new LV Series of 3D-compatible AQUOS Quattron LCD TVs into the Japanese market. The four new LV Series models will be bundled with 3D glasses and feature the company's "four-primary-color" technology which adds yellow to the conventional red, blue and green primary colors to improve the reproduction of colors like (yes) yellow, gold and emerald green. Sharp has also announced new LX Series and super slim XF Series 2-D AQUOS Quattron LCD TVs and two new AQUOS Blu-ray recorders that support 3-D Blu-ray. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Toshiba develops low crosstalk 3D glasses

By - May 20, 2010 1 Picture
Aside from the obvious fashion concerns arising from donning 3D glasses (which is already being addressed with the release of designer 3D eyewear) the biggest drawback of active shutter glasses is crosstalk. This refers to the ghosting of images when the right eye sees some residue of the image intended for the left eye and vice versa. Toshiba has now developed new high-response LCD panels that can be used in active shutter glasses to reduce crosstalk. Read More
— Computers

TweakTown's week in review - Gateway's ZX4800-06, Sony Bravia 3D LCD TV and much more

By - May 15, 2010 7 Pictures
There's been a good bundle of componentry pass through the TweakTown labs this week including QNAP's new 4-bay NAS, Gateway's ZX4800-06 all-in-one desktop and NETGEAR's Powerline AV 200 XAVB2001 home networking solution. The TweakTown team also gives us the low-down on the Cooler Master CM 690 II Advanced mid-tower chassis and Sony's Bravia 3D LCD TV. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Simple solution turns 3D TV glasses incompatibility on its head

By - May 6, 2010 1 Picture
Although 3D TV manufacturers are playing nicely by agreeing to a standard 3D Blu-ray format, they’ve unfortunately clung to their proprietary ways for active shutter glasses needed to view 3D TV images. This means anyone who shells out for a new 3D TV isn’t able to take their glasses to a friend’s home to watch their 3D TV unless it is the same brand. But the folks at Home Cinema Choice have stumbled across an easy – albeit less than comfortable – solution. Just turn the glasses upside down. Read More
— Around The Home

The world's first 3D newspaper

By - April 29, 2010 1 Picture
In one of the more bizarre media announcements of recent times, News International's LCD (Lowest Common Denominator) British Tabloid The Sun is to publish a 3D edition on June 5 complete with 3D glasses, 3D editorial images, 3D adverts and a 3D Soccer World Cup schedule Wall Chart. It's yet another newspaper first for the Murdoch empire (along with recalibrating public morals by widely distributing images of bare-breasted women), though we suspect the motivation is more related to Murdoch's Sky Sports broadcasting the World Cup in 3D than by any forlorn hope of innovating a reversal of the Sun's circulation which has been in decline for 15 years. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Sharp's four-primary-color LCD TVs go 3D

By - April 13, 2010 2 Pictures
Anyone who has had a chance to experience 3D, whether it be at the cinema or on one of the multitude of 3D TVs hitting the market, will be aware that image brightness takes a hit thanks to the eyewear required for the 3D effect, be they passive or active shutter. Now Sharp has given its four-primary-color TVs we first saw at CES earlier this year the 3D treatment. The company says the sets not only boast the industry’s highest brightness, but also feature extremely low "crosstalk" – the undesirable double “ghost” images evident with many 3D TVs. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Samsung out to steal the 3D TV thunder

By - April 13, 2010 4 Pictures
The roll-out of 3D TV has begun in earnest and Samsung is hoping to capitalize on consumer interest by being first to market in several territories. The company’s 3D sets have been available in Korea for over a month, have recently appeared for sale in the U.S. and European markets, and yesterday Australian availability was announced for next week. So with consumers now actually able to grab the new tech off store shelves, we thought it was time to give a brief summary of what Samsung has on offer. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Mitsubishi announces 2010 line-up of 3D DLP TVs with screen sizes up to 82-inches

By - April 12, 2010 1 Picture
3D TVs using LCD or plasma technology might have collected the lion’s share of press this year, but for those looking for some 3D goodness on an even larger scale Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America (MDEA) has announced its 2010 line up of 3D DLP Home Cinema TVs available in sizes up to a whopping 82-inches. The large screen TVs utilize the same core Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology used in 3D movie theaters which MDEA says is up to 1,000 times faster than LCD technology, providing for a more realistic, sharper 2D and 3D viewing experience. Read More
— Home Entertainment

HDI to reveal laser-driven HD 3D TV

By - April 5, 2010 1 Picture
With the TV heavyweights unleashing a torrent of 3D LCD and plasma TVs on us this year it would be easy to assume that those are the only technologies capable of providing 3D viewing in the home. A small Los Gatos, California-based startup called HDI is out blow such assumptions out of the water with what it says is a superior 3D alternative. By all reports the company’s laser-driven 100-inch 2D/3D Switchable Dynamic Video Projection Television delivers a stunning 3D picture, thanks in part to its boasting the highest refresh rate of any mass-produced television or projector. Read More
— Home Entertainment

LG unveils world’s first full LED 3D TV

By - March 25, 2010 2 Pictures
LG has unveiled what is the sure to be the first of many LED TVs to get the 3D treatment. The LX9500 is illuminated by panels of LEDs directly behind the screen for local dimming, with the 55-inch model alone boasting 1,200 of the semiconductor light sources. The LEDs help the TV achieve a 10,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio while sporting an ultra-thin 22.3mm (less than 1 inch) deep body with a stylish 16mm super-narrow bezel. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement