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3D Printers

Aleph Objects, Inc., maker of the TAZ 3D printer through its LulzBot brand, has released the latest addition to its line of Libre Hardware printers. While bearing a strong resemblance to its predecessor that Gizmag reviewed earlier this month, the TAZ 2 boasts some improvements designed to solidify the printer’s structure and give it standalone functionality. Read More
3D printers have already migrated from factories to the home and are now set to journey into space, where the cost of delivering replacement tools, components and structures can cost in the millions. The AMAZE (Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste & Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products) from the ESA and the European Commission aims to deliver the first 3D metal printer to the International Space Station (ISS) to allow astronauts to print custom objects on demand. Read More
Boasting the largest print envelope available for less than US$5,000, the LulzBot TAZ is a RepRap-style 3D printer that presents an open, no-frills design. The TAZ 1.0 is LulzBot’s fourth generation printer, and it uses the company’s sixth generation hot-end (the nozzle and extrusion mechanism for 3D printing). This printer uses an open-source format for both its software and hardware, also known as Libre Hardware. Read More
Scanning atomic force microscopes, first introduced into commerce in 1989, are a powerful tool for nanoscale science and engineering. Capable of seeing individual atoms, commercial AFM prices range between US$10K and $1M, depending on the unit's features and capabilities. During the recent LEGO2NANO summer school held at Tsinghua University in Beijing, a group of Chinese and English students succeeded in making a Lego-based AFM in five days at a cost less than $500. Read More
For the last week, I've been living with a 3D printer – one of the cheapest on the market: the Flashforge Creator Dual. After 30 or so prints, I've discovered some of the foibles of home 3D printing, and some of the work-arounds. Is this a glimpse into the future of home fabrication, or a niche hobby piece? Grab some hairspray (seriously) and dive in as Gizmag reviews the FlashForge Creator 3D and, more importantly, takes a detailed look at the practicalities of 3D printing at home. Read More
With easy-to-use devices like the Buccaneer and the Cube hitting the market, we're beginning to see a growing trend of 3D printers aimed squarely at the average consumer. Now Zeepro, a design team spread across Switzerland, France, and the US, is adding another desktop printer into the mix that promises to give users an even more elaborate set of tools to work with. The Zim is one of the few pre-assembled 3D printers that offers dual print heads and a low layer resolution to create more complex objects, as well as a camera to monitor print jobs through a smartphone. Read More
Not content with the quality of parts made from 3D printers, and frustrated by the noise and mess created by milling machines, startup Mebotics has designed and built a machine that is both a 3D printer and computer-controlled milling machine at once. And because it's enclosed and can be connected to a vacuum cleaner, the company claims that mess is put to bed, too. Mebotics has turned to crowd-funding to bring the Microfactory (for that's its name) to market. Read More
If you’re in the market for a personal fabrication machine, you probably already know that your budget might allow for a 3D printer or a CNC machine, but not both, and an additional 3D scanner would just be icing. However, all three are now available together on Indiegogo in the form of the FABtotum, one of the first hybrid fabrication machines in a quickly developing market. Read More
A new Kickstarter project is set to launch the world's first all-in-one 3D copy machine that can scan, copy, print and even fax 3D objects. Sporting a 7-inch touchscreen and four easy to operate buttons, the Zeus is a stand alone machine that can work independent of both an internet connection and a desktop computer. So instead of running out to buy a hammer the next time you need one, you could simply scan your neighbors or have a friend fax across their hammer scan and print it out on your end. Read More
You may recall that earlier this year, WobbleWorks made quite a splash on Kickstarter, raising over US$2 million for its 3Doodler. Surprising as it sounds though, there may actually now be some competition in the handheld 3D printer market. Swiss 3D Print recently revealed its own device, called the SwissPen, that sketches wire sculptures in mid-air using heated plastic filaments. Read More