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Super-Secret Spy Lens for your SLR

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December 15, 2008

Super-Secret Spy Lens for your SLR

Super-Secret Spy Lens for your SLR

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December 16, 2008 Designed for capturing raw, natural images without the subject being aware that they are being photographed (and ruining that elusive photo-realism), or lets face it, for just plain snooping around, the Super-Secret Spy Lens allows you to take shots at right angles to the camera lens. Working like a periscope for your SLR, the lens adaptor also rotates through 360 degrees so you can snap subjects above and below you as well as to the left or right, all while you appear to be shooting directly in front.

Sure, if the subject of your clandestine efforts happens to be on the ball they may notice the less than candid hole in the side of your lens, but in many situations the Super-Secret Spy Lens should get the job done.

The Spy Lens works zoom lenses of at least 50mm and a range of adapters are available to suit Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Olympus lenses with different thread sizes.

The Lens plus one adapter costs around USD$50.

Photojojo via Gizmodo.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
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2 Comments

Oh! This technology is so new that it existed for Miranda lenses, back in the 60s!

klavaza
13th August, 2010 @ 07:37 pm PDT

What a neat idea to get that realistic natural picture, minus the subjects going into MC Hammer time!

Saying that, it may not be a good idea if you are a nature photographer. Leave the camera on a branch stub, to only find later you have a birds nest occupying its housing ... Oops ... chiip chhiip!!!

; )

Harpal Sahota.

Harpal Sahota
10th June, 2011 @ 09:44 am PDT
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