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Sun Microsystems announce open petascale computing environment

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November 14, 2007

The Sun Constellation System

The Sun Constellation System

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November 15, 2007 Sun Microsystems, Inc. has announced two new systems designed to address the extreme computation, scale and storage requirements for High Performance Computing (HPC) customers. The Sun Constellation System – billed as the world's first open petascale computing environment – which combines ultra-dense, high performance compute, networking, storage and software into an integrated general purpose system, and the Sun StorageTek 5800 System - designed to help ensure long-term preservation, protection and integrity of massive data stores with extensive metadata facilities.

Sun Constellation System Running the Solaris Operating System, Linux and Windows, the Sun Constellation System is capable of scaling from departmental clusters to the largest supercomputer configurations to help customers solve complex computational problems. It is based on open standards and industry standard components and is capable of scaling from departmental level clusters to systems capable of petascale level computing. The system features ultra-dense compute nodes, ultra-dense Infiniband switching and high performance storage.

The Constellation system comprises a Sun Blade 6048 Modular System – an ultra dense blade server platform which supports SPARC, AMD Opteron and Intel Xeon processors and runs industry standard OS'es including Solaris and Linux. It also comprises the Sun Datacenter Switch 3456 – a single chassis switch designed for petascale, which delivers 12x the capacity of the largest Infiniband switch available today. This enables the system to require 1/6 the number of cables of competitive systems and simplifies the design and management of high performance clusters by reducing the number of Infiniband switching elements by up to 300:1. The system also includes Sun’s new Datacenter Express Services for HPC that can be combined with factory integration services and design through Sun's Customer Ready program to provide a comprehensive, all-in-one systems and services solution that is designed to take the cost and complexity out of HPC infrastructure procurement and management.

Sun StorageTek 5800 System The Sun StorageTek 5800 System is a new category of storage system designed for large-scale storage of fixed data. The first commercially available fixed content storage system with a commitment to open source its code, the Sun StorageTek 5800 System helps ensure long-term accessibility to data and delivers simpler deployment and management capabilities than traditional file/block-based storage. The system allows customers to scale seamlessly, potentially saving millions in administrative costs. Designed for long-term preservation and protection of data assets, the system helps protect against data corruption and loss with advanced data integrity functionality and assurances.

"With today's announcements, we've designed and are delivering the next big thing – open computer and storage platforms in an extremely scalable architecture that brings the power of industrial grade computing to department level clusters and all the way up to the petaflop environments,” said John Fowler, executive vice president, Systems Group, Sun Microsystems. The Sun Constellation System and the Sun StorageTek 5800 system were demonstrated on-stage at the Supercomputing 2007 conference in Reno, NV, on Tuesday while those who missed out can check out the Constellation again on Thursday, Nov. 15.

Further info about the Sun Constellation System is available here and more info on the Sun StorageTek 5800 System can be found here.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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