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The Games of the 29th Olympiad get underway today in Beijing and millions of viewers will be treated to an unprecedented coverage with all sports to be captured by by high-definition cameras for the first time. Dvice has compiled a fascinating list of numbers that show just how huge this high-tech broadcasting exercise will be and outlining the massive resources that have been poured into the event to make this possible - 2,200 hours of live streaming broadband coverage, 3,000 hours of on-demand video, 20,000 journalists and an investment of $40 million in HD equipment China...  Read More

Cleatskins will be available in pull-over and slip-on models

Designed to slip over cleats used in sports like soccer, baseball, football and golf, this new footwear accessory protects studs off the field and eliminates the need to change shoes after training or a match.  Read More

Fusion Motion Capture set to revolutionise biomechanical analysis

The development of Fusion Motion Capture (FMC) by Massey University PhD student Matthew Brodie has some broad implications for sport. Though initially focussed on enabling biomechanical analysis of ski racing, Brodie’s FMC system is worn by the athlete and promises much for the understanding of many sports. Unlike traditional biomechanical analysis which uses video cameras, FMC, using a range of inertial sensors, pressure pads and GPS attached to the athlete’s limbs, helmet and feet to generate raw data from the athlete’s movement. The numbers are then crunched by a computer to produce accurate estimates of the position, velocity and acceleration of the limb segments. Indeed, FMC can be reasonably expected to eventually offer a much deeper understanding of biomechanics for any sport, with particular benefits for sports such as long distance running, cycling, rowing, mountain biking, yachting, skating and even to analyse movements that are normally hidden from view, such as behaviour inside a rugby scrum. FMC almost certainly has other applications, such as postural and gait analysis, an interface for computer games, motion capture for the film and games industry and to provide a visual biomechanical analysis of an athlete playing any sport to enhance the experience of the television audience. Click here for a simple video explanation of FMC.  Read More

Nike Swift 'System of Dress'

Shaving milliseconds of personal best times could mean the difference between gold and silver at the forthcoming Beijing Olympics - and once again high-tech clothing is seen as one way of finding that extra yard. Speedo's LZR Racer swimsuit has already had a record run since its release in February and now it's Nike's turn to bask in the Olympic spotlight with the unveiling of its new ultra-lightweight uniforms for the USA’s 2008 Track and Field team (USATF).  Read More

The racehorse training and monitoring vehicle

One of the most interesting vehicles we’ve seen in a while is this mobile racehorse training vehicle from Turkish racehorse and camel training equipment specialist Kurt Systems. The mobile race trainer provides a moving enclosure in which a horse can walk, trot or gallop (up to 60kmh) in a controlled environment. The vehicle carries an array of heart, blood, oxygen and fitness monitoring equipment and precision hydraulically controlled accessories, such as a silicone saddle to simulate jockey weights.  Read More

Nick Notara's collapsible surfboard concept

June 2, 2008 Things that travel well on water are usually equally as cumbersome on dry land. We've seen collapsible solutions for larger craft like catamarans but what about the humble surfboard? Although modern designs are much less of a hassle to transport than the long boards of old, wrestling six feett of fiberglass into the back of the wagon, tying it to the roof, or even negotiating airports can still present quite a challenge. An inflatable surfboard is one solution, another is this collapsible concept design from Nick Notara - it's a surfboard that breaks down into two pieces for transportation purposes whilst retaining its structural integrity via the use of a carbon fiber backbone and two self centering, constant loading pin joints.  Read More

The Shadow Caddy

May 16, 2008 Mark Twain once famously quipped that "Golf is a good walk spoiled". Perhaps if he'd had access to the fully autonomous Shadow Caddy, he might have been a little more enthusiastic. The ability to trail you around the course without the use of remote control makes this a civilized compromise between dragging a set of clubs and foregoing the benefits of a pleasant stroll entirely by riding in a golf cart. It's also cheaper than hiring a human caddy and because it operates itself, it leaves your mind free to concentrate on connecting with that little white ball.  Read More

Basketball Intelligym computer game improves on-court basketball skills

May 6, 2008 There’s an overwhelming body of evidence that the brain, much like any other part of the human body, can be trained for improved performance in a host of different ways. Now a computer game that uses technology originally developed to help train fighter pilots is getting remarkable results in helping aspiring professional basketballers improve their real, on-court game. Known as Basketball IntelliGym the system looks like an innocent computer game – but much more is actually going on. As the player manipulates simple movements on the screen, “shooting” ammunition at moving targets, the system is busy analyzing skills and customizing a training program for the player.  Read More

The Cricket ball that measures its own speed

In the game of cricket, the express bowler holds a special place. The fastest of the fast bowlers deliver the ball at around 100mph and since the first radar guns were used to measure ball speed, the public has been fascinated with the ongoing quest to be the “fastest bowler in the world." Now you no longer need a radar gun to get an accurate reading of your speed with a new cricket ball produced that puts the measuring technology inside the ball so any budding Brett Lee can work on their speed.  Read More

Retul active motion capture technology

April 18, 2008 The Retul 3-D motion capture and analysis technology system for cyclists promises fast and accurate data collection to aid in bike fitting, avoiding injury and ultimately, better bike design. The active system, which uses infra-red LEDs (light emitting diodes) placed on the body in specific skeletal locations, will be used by the US Triathlon team in the lead up to the Beijing Olympics.  Read More

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