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Nike iPhone App for Runners – very useful

Nike has rolled-out a new Nike+ GPS iPhone App for iPhone and iPod touch. It is predominately a GPS app that allows you to visually map your run in addition to monitoring time, pace, distance and calories burned. If you're running on a treadmill or out of GPS range the accelerometer is used to keep the data coming and audio feedback and motivation is delivered by the likes of Paula Radcliffe or Lance Armstrong.  Read More

The KTM eGnition on display at Eurobike 2010

The Austrian KTM eGnition was definitely one of the more interesting bicycles at last week's Eurobike show in Germany. It has the frame and components of a freeride mountain bike, but with a 1,000-watt Clean Mobile electric motor that delivers extra power when the rider is pedaling. The fact that the electric assist is only available when pedaling was a key factor in the design of the eGnition, as KTM wanted it to be clearly different than an electric motorbike. The folks who run Eurobike obviously approved, as it received their Design Award for this year’s event.  Read More

The Attitube uses water motion resistance to build core strength

If you’ve ever tried carrying an aquarium full of water, you’ll know that not only is the stuff heavy, but it’s also difficult to keep from sloshing back and forth. The Attitube, a relatively new fitness training device, takes advantage of those qualities to build core stability. Designed by Canadian former professional wrestler and present-day strength and stability coach Larry Brun, the Attitube is a simply a clear hollow tube with water inside. You use it like you would a barbell or dumbbell, with the motion of the water adding an extra challenge for your core muscles.  Read More

The LiveRider mount and wireless receiving dongle

The popularity of Apple’s iPhone and iPod touch hasn’t just resulted in an explosion of apps available from the iTunes Store, it’s also spawned a stack of hardware accessories designed to extend the capabilities of said devices. Most common are the seemingly endless array of docks, or cases that increase the devices’ battery life. New Potato Technologies has decided for something a bit different with its LiveRider – a bike mounting system that turns your iPhone/iPod touch into a wireless cycling computer.  Read More

Computer rendering of the HXC wheelchair

Quite a few people have heard of wheelchair basketball and sledge hockey, but perhaps not so many are familiar with Hardcore Sitting. That’s what wheelchair athlete Aaron Fotheringham calls his sport, which involves doing BMX/skateboarding-style stunts on a wheelchair at a skatepark. Los Angeles-based industrial designer Joven De La Vega was so inspired by Fotheringham, he decided to design a wheelchair tailored specifically to the sport. The working prototype – dubbed the HXC Wheelchair – can be compared to a freestyle BMX street bike.  Read More

UC3M's technology analyzes the actions of players to determine which plays will work best

If there’s one thing that sports fans love to debate, it’s coaching strategies. “Why didn’t he keep more players back to play defense?” “How come he had him pass instead of run with it?” “He should never have let that guy bat when the bases were loaded!” Such discussions could seemingly go on forever, as it’s impossible to definitively say what the right course of action would have been... or maybe not. Artificial intelligence researchers at Spain’s Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are developing technology that could analyze a team’s performance, then objectively determine the best plays for specific situations.  Read More

The Greendix solar-powered soccer balls

There are obviously some people out there who think that soccer balls aren’t doing enough. Earlier this year, we told you about the sOccket, a ball that generates power as it gets kicked around. Now, word comes to us of soccer ball prototypes with built-in solar panels. Where the black pentagonal sections would normally be, these balls instead have custom-designed panels that gather energy as they bask in the sun. That energy is used for running onboard motion sensors, and audio devices that emit a tracking sound whenever the balls are kicked. It is hoped that this sort of technology could be used to allow visually-impaired people to play soccer in the future.  Read More

The ShadowBox attaches to boards of all sorts

No one believing your tales of gnarly moves pulled on some off-piste run? Can’t convince your friends you nailed a Spock 540 One Handed when no one was looking? Now you can prove it (or get a harsh dose of reality) with the ShadowBox – a "personal 3D sports recorder" that attaches to your extreme sporting implement of choice and uses GPS and G-Force data to record a "ride path" of all your extreme sporting moves. Ride data can be viewed immediately on the device or uploaded to a PC or Mac to analyze all your extreme sporting moves in 3D detail.  Read More

The latest version of the RoboCup

Last year, we told you about a little something cleverly named the RoboCup. Designed for golfers practicing their putting, it sits inside the hole on the green, and gently shoots balls up to 14 feet back to the golfer. It runs on four AA batteries, which should be good for around 15,000 ball-returns – that’s a lot of saved walking over and bending over. Fine Tune Golf has now announced the launch of “the new generation of RoboCup”... RoboCup 2, perhaps?  Read More

Newly-presented research reportedly proves that modern skis perform better without wax

For the past several years, debate has been brewing amongst cross-country skiers as to the merits of ski-waxing. Back when all skis had a wooden base, adding wax was essential in order to get them to glide across the snow. Many skiers still swear by waxing today, even though skis now have supposedly “no-wax” polyethylene gliding surfaces. Waxing can be a tricky process, though - if you use a wax with the wrong temperature rating, you can end up sticking to the snow, or slipping back and forth in one spot. It’s also time-consuming, and requires the skis to be periodically stripped of their built-up wax layers. Now, a researcher from Mid Sweden University (MSU) claims to have proof that modern skis work better without wax, and says that “those who claim otherwise are practicing voodoo and not science.”  Read More

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