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Sonim XP3300 FORCE - rugged enterprise mobile with world's longest talk time

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February 16, 2011

Sonim XP3300 FORCE - rugged enterprise mobile with world's longest talk time

Sonim XP3300 FORCE - rugged enterprise mobile with world's longest talk time

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Rugged mobile phone maker Sonim Technologies seems to be on a never-ending mission to create products that can withstand whatever extreme torture can be thrown at them. The company has just announced another tough cookie that's been designed to help enterprise and government organizations locate, track and manage its mobile workforce - whatever conditions they may find themselves in. As well as some impressive tough guy credentials, the XP3300 FORCE also lays claim to the industry's longest talk and stand-by time.

The XP3300 FORCE is a quad band GSM with GPRS and EDGE class 12 data capability and Bluetooth 2.1. It's built on the MediaTek MT6235 ARM-based platform and features an omni-directional, noise-canceling microphone, a 2 megapixel camera with LED flash (which also doubles as a torch), MicroSD slot and an FM radio and media player. It comes pre-installed with the popular Opera Mini browser, a native email client and the City Cruiser turn-by-turn, voice-guided navigation application backed by enterprise-class GPS.

The list of tough credentials starts with IP68-certification, which means it should withstand being plonked 6.5 feet (2 meters) underwater for at least an hour and there's a waterproof vent for 23mm diameter external speaker, which has a claimed max output of 100 dB. The headset and USB ports are similarly water-tight. Its non-porous fiberglass casing, which benefits from a hardened rubber shell dual-injection molded to it, keeps dust and microparticles where they should be - outside. It should also be able to survive a drop from the same height onto concrete.

The phone comes pre-installed with the popular Opera Mini browser, a native email client a...

It's said to work in temperature extremes from -20 degrees C to 55 above freezing, is shock resistant up to 4G and has vibration protection from 5Hz to 500Hz. It benefits from salt, fog, humidity, transport shock and thermal shock protection to MIL-810G certification standards and has spaced input keys to cater for gloved use. The 2-inch, 240 x 320 resolution display sits behind 1.5mm thick, shock and scratch-resistant Corning Gorilla Glass, which is said to be able to stand up to a 4 meter drop hit by a 50g steel ball.

The XP3300 FORCE's 1750 mAh battery is reported to power the device for up to 20 to 24 hours of talk time and a massive 800 hours standby, which is more than enough to cope with the 16-hour shift work that the phone was designed for. Workforce location monitoring, fleet tracking, monitoring, timecard reporting, real-time work order updates, alerts, job scheduling, event confirmation, data collection and reports via MRM applications benefit from 26 hours of GPS tracking functionality.

Although the obligatory tested-to-destruction video attempts have yet to appear, Sonim's Virginia Jamieson told Gizmag that the XP3300 FORCE "is available right now for US$499 unlocked - without a contract. As Carrier deals emerge the price will vary depending on where you buy it."

About the Author
Paul Ridden While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.   All articles by Paul Ridden
2 Comments

I visited the site .. read the device usermanual. They seem to go to great lengths to omit any discussion of what the OS is .. Java, ya, but that could mean anything. One hint is that one sync's stuff with Microsoft Office .. but even that is not actually revealing the OS. It always amazes me , in this cell-phone world of ours, that by far most cell's use batteries from 1400mAh to maybe 1700. Some can accept 'extended batteries' that can double that. The issue is: sitting on my desk are 4 2500mAh AA's !!! and their size wouldnt make any phone thicker than it would be were it running with its 'extended battery'. Now, 4x 2500 is maybe 10,000 mAh !! all in approx the same volume and replaceable at modest cost. !! We cant say that the stock cell batt's have added technology (ie, capacity/charging status) cuz i can take those same 2500's and put into a computer-controlled (like one minichip!) charging device which reads the same info .. avoiding overcharging, etc .Sometimes an entire industry fails to see the obvious!tkjtkj@gmail.com

tkj
17th February, 2011 @ 06:51 am PST

Well you omitted the fact that lithium batteries are 3.7V and your nimh are 1.2v so you need 3 times as many AA at the same Ah. Considering your 2.5Ah AAs, two of them would match a 1.6Ah lithium battery. Then there is the form factor - lithiums can successfully be built thin and they also weigh much less.

Alexander Engman
13th March, 2011 @ 08:45 am PDT
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