Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Sharp four primary color TVs enable over one trillion colors

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January 20, 2010

Sharp displayed the Aquos television series featuring brilliant-color technology at CES 20...

Sharp displayed the Aquos television series featuring brilliant-color technology at CES 2010

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Although Sharp seems to have a slightly shaky grasp on the number of primary colors - last time we counted, there was only three - it has come up with a fairly breath-taking LCD television that made its debut at CES. The Aquos LED LCD TV series are set to revolutionize television color as we know it. They boast an industry-first four-color filter that can create brilliant blues and sparkling yellows. Called quad-pixel technology, this means that colors which were difficult to reproduce on conventional LCD screens will now be available for your viewing pleasure. And for a total home-theater experience, one of the models has an industry-first 68-inch screen.

By adding yellow to the colors red, green and blue, the televisions are capable of rendering nearly all the colors a human eye can discern. The televisions also feature a 1080p X-Gen LCD panel. This panel incorporates UV2A technology which helps to reduce energy consumption in comparison to traditional fluorescent-backlight LCD TVs. Also included is Sharp’s Aquos Net, enabling users to receive streaming video via Netflix, access to customized web-based content and Aquos Advantage Live customer support.

Mikio Katayama, president and chief operating officer, Sharp Corporation, said, “As a pioneer in the LCD industry, Sharp continues to advance the technology, introducing it’s first LED-backlight LCD TV on the market less than two years ago and paving the way for larger screen sizes, thin designs and Internet connectivity. We have changed the way an LCD TV produces an image with the new four-primary-color technology, allowing us to broaden the visual experience and immerse consumers in a new world of color.”

The LE920 and LE820 series also have an ultra thin, (1.6 inches) full-frontal panel glass that caresses the border of the television and creates a slim-line, subtle edge. The models also have a function that automatically adjusts the unit’s brightness depending on the lighting in the room. All lines are also compliant with the Energy Star version 4.0 standards which will become effective in May 2010.

LE920 series

This full high-definition LCD series screens come in 68-inch, (LC-68LE920UN) 60-inch (LC-60LE920UN) and 52-inch (LC-52LE920UN) screen class sizes (68 1/32”, 60 1/32” and 52 1/32” diagonals respectively). Also incorporated is AquoMotion 240, which assists in eliminating blurring on fast-moving video and a USB media player. The series is expected to be released in May, with pricing to be advised.

LE820/810 series

These models are available in 60-inch (LC-60LE820UN and LC-60LE810UN), 52-inch (LC-52LE820UN and LC-52LE810UN), 46-inch (LC-46LE820UN and LC-46LE810UN) and 40-inch (LC-40LE820UN and LC-40LE810UN) screen class sizes (60 1/32”, 52 1/32”, 45 63/64” and 40” diagonals respectively). The models feature fine motion enhanced technology for 120hz frame rate conversion and fast response time (4 ms). There are four HDMI with Instaport quick switching so when switching between sources, delays are avoided. Included are an Ethernet jack, PC input, USB input and a 1080p component video input.

The 820/810 series will be available from Sharp in March 2010. Pricing is expected to range from USD2,199.99 for the 40-inch model (LC-40LE820UN) and USD3,999.99 for the 60-inch model (LC-60LE820UN).

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2 Comments

Yellow is a "secondary" color, but adding a yellow pixel can make for, perhaps, a brighter and more accurate picture. Who knows? Maybe there will be a six-color panel soon, including cyan and magenta pixels.

The calibrators will LOVE that for color accuracy.

Now if only the manufacturers all had a video mode for out-of-the box accurate colors... only one or two do that now, but it's needed badly... too many TV's are running in "Torch" mode, with neon greens, and bright red skin tones... very unrealistic. We don't need one trillion colors, we just need the colors that we have reproduced as accurately as possible!

matthew.rings
21st January, 2010 @ 10:29 pm PST

this is a major step forward .

next step is beyond the vision-able spectrum to enhance our natural senses !

im proud of Japan.

thank you.

robert keers

robertuskeers
23rd January, 2010 @ 02:40 pm PST
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