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Science

Space

World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead

A smartphone with a 16-megapixel camera may seem cutting edge, but it won't impress astronomers now that the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has given the green light to start construction of the world's largest digital camera. With a resolution of 3.2-gigapixels (enough to need 1,500 high-definition television screens to display one image), the new camera is at the heart of the 8.4-meter (27.5-ft) Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) now under construction atop Cerro Pachón in Chile.Read More

Medical

Mouth guard could continuously monitor diabetes, and more

We've already heard about an electronics-packing mouthguard that can be used to detect serious impacts to the head. Now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed one that could provide continuous readings of users' health markers including lactate, cortisol and uric acid. It may be used to monitor the well-being of people such as diabetics, to track the performance of athletes, or to detect stress in soldiers.Read More

Electronics

Logitech caters to gamers with Artemis Spectrum headsets

To some, playing video games is something one does on occasion for fun and/or to kill some time. To many others, gaming is a passionate hobby that demands the best of the best. Whether it's upgrading to the latest PC hardware, or creating comfortable seating for friends around a console device, many gamers look for ways to maximize the experience. Logitech has just announced its Artemis Spectrum G933 and G633 headsets, which cater to those who demand high-performance audio and cross-platform compatibility.Read More

Materials

Naturally-occurring protein has melting ice cream problem licked

There are few things that go as well together as an ice cream cone and a hot summer's day, but it can be a race against the clock to get the sweet treat down before it turns into a sticky mess. Such disasters could become a thing of the past thanks to scientists in Scotland who have discovered a naturally-occurring protein that can be added to ice cream to make it melt more slowly.Read More

Environment

Nanotech could rid cattle of ticks, with less collateral damage

If you've ever used tick medicine on your dog, then you're probably aware of how toxic the stuff is. Well, it's used on cows too, and it can end up in their meat, milk, or the surrounding environment. Fortunately, however, scientists at the National University of Mexico have developed a new type of tick treatment for cattle that is reportedly much less toxic than what's currently used.Read More

Electronics

DIY mouse trap sends photo alert when critter is caught

Humane mouse traps come in all shapes and sizes, but the aim of the game is the same – catch the pesky rodents that are munching through your breakfast cereal and evict them from the premises. For the most part, electronics don't feature. The RaspiTrap from tinkerer Alain Mauer is a little different. With the help of a slice of Raspberry Pi, a splash of IR sensor flavoring and some Wi-Fi magic, it sends a photo notification when the door closes behind a new prisoner.Read More

Space

Danish astronaut to control earthbound rover from ISS

Working outside in space is a tall order. The environment is hostile, even the smallest job takes hours instead of minutes, and everything has to be done in either bulky suits or through robotic arms. It's a challenge that will become even more difficult when future astronauts are controlling robotic rovers from orbit, so ESA is getting in a bit of practice. Next month Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen will take control of a rover in the Netherlands while orbiting the Earth aboard the International Space Station.Read More

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