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Science

Space

Can an Earth-sized telescope show us what a black hole looks like?

With a gravitational pull so great not even light can escape, it's impossible to directly observe a black hole. But scientists have created a new algorithm that may allow astronomers to generate the first full image of a black hole. Using data collected from a connected array of radio telescopes around the world, the algorithm effectively turns the Earth into a gigantic radio telescope with a resolution factor more than a thousand times greater than that of the Hubble Space Telescope.Read More

Space

Now you can listen to 13 billion year-old stars

A team of astrophysicists from the University of Birmingham has successfully used Kepler data to capture the sounds emitted by ancient stars. The study focused on eight red giant stars, the smallest of which is many times the mass of our Sun, and almost three times its current age.Read More

Environment

Toothpaste pods brush away waste

Few people would look at toothpaste tubes as being in need of improvement, until, perhaps, they realize how long they take to decompose and how many get thrown away. Poppits toothpaste, however, doesn't come in a tube, but in waste-free pods that dissolve in the mouth.Read More

Space

Gravitational-wave hunter LISA turns out to be a true high performer

The mark of a very fine scientific instrument isn't usually how well it can fall, but in the case of the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, that one metric could help astrophysicists decode the very fabric of the universe. Fortunately after just two months of testing, the tech aboard LISA has done exceptionally well in free falling – performing much better than expected and boosting hopes that we can soon have a powerful tool to capture gravitational waves.Read More

Science

Window in mouse shows its "gut feelings"

You've no doubt been urged to "go with your gut" when facing a tricky decision that you just can't seem to think your way through. It turns out, the gut can indeed act as something of a second brain, as it contains five times more neurons than the spinal cord. Despite this cache of neurological activity, the gut's nervous system has not been extensively observed. To fix that, a Duke University researcher did the logical thing – inserted a window in a mouse's abdomen so he could watch.Read More

Medical

New antimicrobial material joins fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Last month, the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance warned of a possible future in which emerging superbugs render current antibiotics ineffective, and called for more research into developing new drugs to help prevent that scenario. Thankfully, we've seen some promising developments in recent years and now scientists in Singapore have contributed to the effort with the creation of a new material that not only kills microbes quickly, but prevents antibiotic-resistant bacteria from growing in their place.Read More

Environment

Scientists take the fish out of fish food

It's one of the great environmental ironies of aquaculture – although the fish themselves come from farms, the food that they're raised on still contains wild-caught fish. A few years ago, however, a study showed that prawns could be fed microbes instead of fish byproducts. Now, a more recent study has concluded the same thing about tilapia, one of the most farmed fish in the world.Read More

Space

The Universe may be expanding much faster than we thought

New measurements carried out using the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that the Universe may be expanding up to 9 percent faster than previously believed. The team behind the study, which is the most accurate of its kind ever undertaken, believe that the culprit for the unexpected acceleration could be one of the invisible phenomena thought to comprise roughly 95 percent of the Universe.Read More

Medical

SkinGun shoots burn victims with their own stem cells

Guns are often thought about for their destructive nature, but a new kind of gun is set to help heal rather than harm. Called the SkinGun, the device applies stem cells to the site of a burn in a novel way, helping increase both treatment and recovery time over standard methods. New tests show that it delivered a healing spray with 200 times more coverage than traditional methods.Read More

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