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Science

Science

Using stem cells to save rhinos from extinction

The northern white rhino is right on the brink of extinction, with only three of the species left on the planet. There's zero hope for the animals surviving naturally, but a team of scientists believes it might still be possible to bring the species back from the brink, with hopes of using stored genetic information to produce a new population.Read More

Electronics

Simple MIDI synth squeezed into a USB plug

A few months after creating what was claimed to be the world's smallest MIDI synthesizer, which was smaller than the capsule at the end of a 5-pin DIN cable, a self-confessed MIDI lover and prolific electronics tinkerer has managed to cram a tone generating circuit into the black plastic frame inside a USB plug.Read More

Space

MESSENGER spacecraft provides first global topographical model of Mercury

Using data captured by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, a team of scientists has constructed the first complete digital elevation model (DEM) of the planet Mercury. The newly-released map reveals the geographical highs and lows of the innermost planet in our solar system, as well as highlighting a number of fascinating surface characteristics.Read More

Medical

Drugs that mistake placenta for tumors to help avoid premature births

The placenta is vital for a growing fetus, providing it with the nourishment needed to develop as it prepares to enter the world. But a poorly functioning placenta is problematic as doctors are unable to treat it with drugs and are instead forced to induce labor early, inviting a range of health risks for the prematurely born baby. But scientists have now found a way in by using existing cancer drugs that mistake the placenta for a tumor, selectively targeting the organ and boosting its health.Read More

Space

Luxembourg joins asteroid mining space race

With a population of under 600,000, it's not surprising Luxembourg isn't currently on the list of spacefaring nations. But that hasn't stopped its government, along with the Luxembourg Société Nationale de Crédit et d'Investissement (SNCI), entering into a partnership with the US asteroid mining company Deep Space Industries (DSI) as part of the country's spaceresources.lu initiative to develop new commercial space technologies with an emphasis on asteroid mining.Read More

Science

Silk coating makes for fresher fruit

How often do you end up throwing out fruit that spoiled before you could eat it? Well, it may soon be happening a lot less, thanks to a silk-based coating being developed at Tufts University in Massachusetts. Strawberries treated with the substance remained fresh and juicy for up to a week without refrigeration – unlike their untreated counterparts.Read More

Environment

Seismic vibrations provide a new, accurate way to monitor ice sheet decline

We currently measure changes in ice sheets via data gathered by missions such as NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite, or by flying planes over a region and using lasers to map topography. But there could be a better way, with a team of researchers, led by scientists at MIT, getting positive results from a new method that tracks seismic vibrations caused by ocean waves to measure changes in ice volume.Read More

Space

How to view the upcoming Mercury transit

On Monday the 9th of May, the planet Mercury will make a rare transit of our Sun. The event is a precious opportunity to observe firsthand the ordinarily hidden celestial mechanics that govern our solar system. A tortured ball of rock less than half the size of Earth, Mercury represents the innermost planet in our Solar System, orbiting a mere 36 million miles from our Sun.Read More

Medical

Non-invasive device monitors diabetes using microwaves

For diabetics, keeping track of blood sugar can be a drag, with Type 1 sufferers having to monitor their levels as much as six times a day. A new device might make life significantly easier, providing a non-invasive solution for tracking glucose levels, without the need to extract blood.Read More

Science

Boiling water makes for cooler electronics

Boiling water seems a straightforward enough exercise, you flick on the gas and wait for the bubbles to start popping. But by manipulating how many of those bubbles appear as the temperature rises, scientists have discovered a new way to finely control how much heat and steam is released in the process, a technique they say could lead to advanced cooling systems for more efficient electronic devices. Read More

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