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— Science Review

CSIRO's Lab 22: Kickstarting a 3D printing revolution in titanium

By - June 9, 2015 35 Pictures

Australia is wasting billions of dollars of potential value by shipping its world-beating titanium reserves out of the country as raw ore. That's why CSIRO's Lab 22 is making millions of dollars' worth of 3D printing facilities available to Australian businesses in an effort to kick-start a local additive manufacturing revolution that could add billions of dollars' worth of value to the country's raw titanium exports.

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— Science

Earth's oceans found to be a much greater source of greenhouse gas than previously believed

By - June 8, 2015 1 Picture

A new study by MIT has revealed that the quantities of nitrous oxide (N2O), otherwise known as laughing gas, being released by the world's oceans has been dramatically underestimated. Heightened levels of N2O have the potential to seriously influence the health of our planet's ozone layer, as the gas is around 300 times more potent than the more prevalent menace of carbon dioxide emissions.

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— Science

Almost universal SERS sensor could change how we sniff out small things

By - June 3, 2015 1 Picture

Identifying fraudulent paintings based on electrochemical data, highlighting cancerous cells in a sea of healthy ones, and identifying different strains of bacteria in samples of food are all examples of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a sensor system that has only become more in-demand as our desire for precise, instantaneous information has increased. However, the technology has largely failed commercialization because the chips used are difficult and expensive to create, have limited uses for a particular known substance, and are consumed upon use. Researchers led by a team from the University of Buffalo (UB) aim to change nanoscale sensors with an almost-universal substrate that's also low-cost, opening up more opportunities for powerful analysis of our environment.

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— Science

Scientists come a step closer to "regrowing" limbs

By - June 3, 2015 2 Pictures

Currently, recipients of arm or leg transplants need to take immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of their lives, in order to keep the donated parts from being rejected. If we could grow our own replacement limbs, however, that wouldn't be necessary. And while we do already possess the progenitor cells needed to grow such parts, what's been lacking is a method of assembling them into the form of the desired limb. Now, however, scientists have created a shortcut of sorts – they've stripped the cells from one rat's forelimb and replaced them with live cells from another rat, creating a functioning limb that the second rat's immune system won't reject.

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