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A new 3D microscope has been developed at Columbia University Medical Center that is able ...

Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new 3D microscope prototype dubbed "SCAPE" (Swept Confocally Aligned Planar Excitation Microscopy), which requires no mounting of samples or other special preparation, and is capable of imaging freely moving living samples at speeds 10 to 100 times faster than current laser-scanning microscopes.  Read More

The PNSN relied on what it called '12th man energy' to produce the simulated earthquake (I...

When sports fans get really excited it seems like there's an earthquake – and scientists don't want to let that phenomenon go to waste. As the American football teams the Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers faced off in Seattle on the weekend, University of Washington seismologists with the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) planted seismographs to study the fanmade "earthquake" caused as a way of testing new sensors and software.  Read More

Researchers have increased the lifespan of the common fruit fly by activating a gene repso...

Using a technique in which better cells in the body to be selected at the expense of more damaged ones, researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have managed to significantly increase the lifespan of the common fruit fly. Although most people would like to see flies living shorter, not longer lives, the development could have implications for increasing the lifespan of humans.  Read More

Did it just get colder in here? (Photo:  Shutterstock)

Did your temperature drop a bit looking at that picture above? If so, then research out of the University of Sussex in the UK could have the reason why. According to a team of researchers, simply looking at someone visibly experiencing cold is enough to drop the body temperature of the viewer significantly.  Read More

Duke University researchers claim to be the first to grow contracting human muscle tissue ...

Researchers working at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering claim to have produced a laboratory first by having grown human muscle tissue that contracts and reacts to stimuli. Electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals have all been used to produce reactions in the tissue that show it behaves in the same way that natural human muscles does. As a result, laboratory grown tissue may soon provide researchers with the ability to study diseases and assess drugs without invasive procedures on human subjects.  Read More

The Autosub6000 returns from the deep

Curious about what's living on the deep sea floor? Well, the Autosub6000 AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) is helping us find out. Led by Dr. Kirsty Morris, a team at the UK's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has equipped one of the unmanned submarines with a high-resolution photographic system. As a result, it's claimed to be far more effective at identifying deep-sea life than the usual approach of scientific trawling.  Read More

Based on nothing but Facebook 'likes,' a computer is able to judge a person's personality ...

New research has found that computers can "judge" personality traits far more precisely than previously thought. The study found that it is possible for computers to draw inferences about a person as accurately as their spouse can. Even then, the judgements were based only on Facebook "likes."  Read More

Quantum information has been written onto europium atoms and stored for up to six hours in...

Researchers from the Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Otago in New Zealand have created a prototype quantum hard drive that may fundamentally alter the realm of secure, long-distance data encryption. Using atoms of the rare-earth element europium embedded in yttrium orthosilicate (YSO) crystals, the scientists have shattered previous records for quantum information retention by creating a storage device capable of holding quantum state information for up to six hours at a time.  Read More

These self-folded origami structures created using a technique developed at UMass Amhurst ...

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have appropriated a less-common technique of origami known as "collapse"-type, in which all folds are carried out more or less simultaneously, to create complex reversibly self-folded 3D structures around a millimeter in size. The new technique is expected to have applications in soft robotics, mechanical metamaterials, and biomimetic systems (synthetic systems that mimic systems from nature).  Read More

LLNL physical chemist George Farquar, who led the team that invented DNATrax, demonstrates...

According to the US Center for Disease Control (CDC), 129,000 Americans are sent to hospital and 3,000 die each year from food poisoning. Currently, tracing contaminated food is largely a matter of record keeping and detective work, but Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, in partnership with DNATrek, have developed DNATrax, a DNA-based additive for directly tracking food from producer to consumer.  Read More

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