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Science

If the sensor goes pink, then don't drink

Unlike wine, beer doesn't age well. It goes stale, becoming a foul-tasting concoction that breweries certainly shouldn't be sending out to stores or bars. While brewers do already perform tests to gauge freshness, those typically involve expensive gas chromatography equipment and take time to conduct. Soon, however, a simple color-changing sensor and an Android app may be all that's required.Read More

Science

Researchers discover new property of light with a twist

Light is a fundamental avenue of study in physics, and its properties are well established with steadfast rules and invariable constraints. So, until recently, we thought we knew just about everything there was to know about it. But now physicists from Trinity College Dublin have added a twist to the existing canon by demonstrating a new form of light with a total angular momentum that has a half-integer spin. In other words, light that does not obey the rules.Read More

Space

Could life exist around ancient red giant stars?

According to a study carried out by researchers from Cornell University, aged red giant stars could harbor exoplanets suited to the evolution of extraterrestrial life. The team used advanced stellar evolution models to estimate the boundaries of the habitable zones (HZ) of post main sequence (MS) ancient red giant stars, taking into account a wide range of stellar ages and properties.Read More

Science

New compound from sponge blasts bacterial biofilm into submission

Biofilms are the tough gangs of the bacterial world. Formed when bacteria group together in a kind of gooey raft that adheres to surfaces, biofilms are responsible for up to 80 percent of all infections, according to microbiologist Lindsey N. Shaw from the University of Southern Florida (USF). They're also exceedingly difficult to kill. But Shaw and a team of USF researchers have recently uncovered a compound from a sea sponge found in Antarctica that can get the job done.Read More

Electronics

IBM breakthrough gives blistering phase-change memory new practicality

Data storage is one of those things where too much is never enough. And as the amount of data generated increases exponentially, the search is on for new memory technologies that tick all the boxes in terms of speed, endurance, non-volatility and endurance. Phase-change memory (PCM) has emerged as a promising candidate, and now IBM Research has worked out how to triple the amount of data bits each cell can hold, edging the technology closer to a cost-effective, blistering fast data storage solution.Read More

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