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Science

Science

Study suggests there could be more species on Earth than stars in our galaxy

Biologists at Indiana University believe we may have only discovered a mere thousandth of a percent of the species on our planet. To put a number on it, that means the 10 million or so species identified so far represent a drop on the ocean of as many as one trillion total species. As a point of comparison, consider that current estimates suggest that our home galaxy the Milky Way may contain between 100 and 400 billion stars. This is a big number, with possibly big implications. Read More

Medical

Breathe easy: Over-the-phone lung monitoring is just a 1-800 call away

Back in 2012, researchers from the University of Washington (UW) introduced a new tool for those suffering from respiratory problems in the form of a smartphone app that measures lung health. While this may have improved access to care for many, it didn't mean a great deal to those without a smartphone. The team is now looking to expand the reach of its technology by designing a system that allows patients to call in from anywhere in the world, from any phone, to gauge the health of their lungs.Read More

Space

Three newly discovered exoplanets prime candidates in search for life elsewhere in the Universe

Using a telescope especially designed to hunt exoplanets, a team of astronomers working at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered three planets orbiting a dwarf sun, just 40 light-years from Earth. According to the researchers, all three worlds are potentially habitable given their sizes and temperatures, and may be the best possibilities yet in the search for life beyond our solar system.
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Medical

Diagnostic blood test shows promise in early detection of Parkinson's

Early detection of Parkinson's could help doctors decide on treatment options or improve disease management. But often people get a neurological examination after symptoms appear, when vital brain cells have already been destroyed. Now a game-changing blood test is being developed to give doctors a reliable method to detect the disease earlier through clinical biomarkers.Read More

Environment

How infecting carp with herpes can help save dying river systems

When carp were first introduced into Australia in the mid-19th century, acclimatizing settlers hoped the freshwater fish would bring a taste of home to their food and recreational activity down under. Today, these pests are running riot across the country's waterways, seriously compromising the health of its rivers and native species. The Australian government is now moving to cut populations through the controlled release of carp-specific herpes virus, which it says is capable of killing individual fish off within 24 hours. Read More

Space

British astronaut pilots earthbound rover from aboard ISS

Deep space exploration has taken one small step (or roll) forward with the successful test of space-based control of a robot rover from aboard the International Space Station. The experiment saw British ESA astronaut Tim Peake take control of a British-built rover named "Bridget" and guide it around a simulated Martian landscape back on Earth, avoiding obstacles and locating scientific targets along the way.Read More

Science

Inexpensive 3D-printed lens gives terahertz imaging a boost

Terahertz radiation is a growing field of technology that enables faster materials analysis than X-ray examination, and provides non-destructive, internal analysis of a raft of different types of materials. Now researchers have developed a way of manufacturing lenses operating at this frequency that are simple and inexpensive, but are claimed to produce near-flawless images which could vastly improve biomedical imaging as well as biological and explosive security scanning.Read More

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