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Samsung rolls out promised new HDDs

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June 23, 2008

The 500GB Samsung Spinpoint M6

The 500GB Samsung Spinpoint M6

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June 23, 2008 Two previously announced Hard Disk Drives (HDD) from Samsung have entered mass production. The 500GB capacity Spinpoint M6 HDD for laptops and the Spinpoint F1 RAID Class (F1R) 3.5” SATA hard drive that features 1TB capacity were on show at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas last January and are joined by the new Spinpoint MP2 - a 250GB 2.5” hard drive operating at a 7200rpm rotation speed. While the Spinpoint M6 and MP2 are built for the booming laptop market, the Spinpoint F1 is designed for enterprise storage and surveillance applications.

The Spinpoint M6 fits the industry’s standard 9.5mm height dimension and attains its 500GB capacity thanks to three 167GB platters employing Perpendicular Magnetic Recording technology. The size of the drive means that mainstream laptops can now support capacity of up to one terabyte by employing two Samsung Spinpoint M6 drives. For premium notebook PCs, the Spinpoint M6 meets the Microsoft fast-boot design requirements and supports ramp load and unload of up to 600,000 times. It also features a 5400rpm spindle speed, a 8MB cache, and 3.0Gbps SATA interface with a Free-Fall-Sensor available as an optional feature. The drive also features Samsung’s Flying-on-Demand head technology designed to improve recording stability over changing temperature ranges.

With the Spinpoint MP2 on the other hand Samsung has gone for speed instead of size. The MP2 is a 250GB 2.5” hard drive consisting of two 125GB disks, which operates at 7200rpm rotation speed meaning the MP2 can be used for high performance, desktop replacement laptops, and entry-level enterprise applications such as workstations and RAID or blade servers. The MP2 has a 16MB buffer memory, is available in 80GB to 250GB capacities and also features a SATA II 3.0Gbps interface and Native Command Queuing functions for advanced performance. Samsung’s proprietary SilentSeek and NoiseGuard technologies are incorporated in the drive to offer ultra quiet operation and an optional Free Fall Sensor is also available for data protection in case of any unexpected external impact.

Finally the new Spinpoint F1 RAID Class (F1R) 3.5” SATA hard drive delivers 1TB recording capacity using a three-platter structure that provides a higher data storage density per platter. This, coupled with a 7200RPM spindle speed, a 16 or 32MB cache, a Serial ATA 3.0Gbps interface, a 175MB/s maximum media transfer rate, and NCQ for random I/O performance combine to give improved data processing speeds. Boasting a mean time between failure (MTBF) of up to 1.2 million hours and offering enterprise class functions such as command completion time limit and vibration tolerance with Rotation Vibration Controller (RVC), Samsung says the drive is ideal for demanding applications such as database, email and web servers, super computing, software development, data warehousing, surveillance, call centers and nearline/backup storage systems.

The F1 also has improved recording stability via PMR recording and data integrity, and reliability through full-extent dynamic Flying-On-Demand (FOD) control, which dynamically lowers the fly-height in read or write mode while maintaining a consistent and higher fly-height across the disk in standard mode. Its performance is further enhanced through Samsung’s optimized firmware system and an optimized system-on-chip (SOC) controller that lowers power consumption - the Spinpoint F1R uses an average of 6.7 watts in idle mode, an average of 7.8 watts in active mode and operates at just 2.7 Bell in idle mode.

The Samsung Spinpoint M6 has a USD$299 MSRP, the MP2 a USD$199 MSRP and the F1 a US$299 MSRP. All drives are currently shipping.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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