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Samsung announces new flat-panel digital X-ray detector

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November 22, 2007

Samsung Advanced Flat Panel X-ray Detector

Samsung Advanced Flat Panel X-ray Detector

November 23, 2007 Samsung has developed a new flat panel digital X-ray detector (FPXD) for radiology machines that promises faster, cheaper and more accurate imaging in medical labs. Developed in conjunction with Korean medical machinery manufacturing company Vatech, the new device utilizes thin-film transistor (TFT) technology to produce high-resolution (9.4 megapixel) without the need for film or development required in analog film applications.

The 45cm x 46cm (17.7 x 18.8 inch) FPXD is made up of photodiodes attached to a TFT substrate produced using Samsung's proprietary amorphous silicon technology. The device detects X-rays photon by photon, converts them into visible light and then into electrical signals that can be displayed as 3072 x 3072 diagnostic images on a flat panel screen. Samsung has also added an image enhancement function to eliminate most digital image noise interference.

Executive Vice President Yoon Jin-hyuk, chief of the Mobile LCD Division in the Samsung Electronics LCD Business, said, “The analog film camera market almost completely switched over to digital cameras within a decade. The X-ray detector market should move even faster and become completely digitized within a few years.”

According to Samsung, the new X-ray technology also has a range of potential applications beyond conventional X-ray systems including use in building inspections, airport security scanners and elsewhere within the medical field the where it could be adopted for more advanced diagnostics such as CAT scans,

The device will be available worldwide beginning first quarter, 2008.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
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