Rook drone lets users fly around their homes from anywhere in the world

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The Rook can be controlled remotely from anywhere in the world via a smartphone

The Rook can be controlled remotely from anywhere in the world via a smartphone. View gallery (3 images)

Anyone who has piloted a drone knows that wide open spaces are your friend, so the idea of an indoor drone might seem like a questionable idea. But there is method in the madness for the team at Eighty Nine Robots, a company formed by a group of students from Northwestern University. Their Rook drone is intended to allow users to remotely do a sweep of the interior of their homes from anywhere in the world via a Wi-Fi connection and an iOS or Android device.

Once the Rook is connected to the user's home Wi-Fi, it can be remotely controlled via smartphone and used as an indoor flying security camera, giving users the ability to monitor and investigate any activity that seems to be out of the ordinary. The Rook can also be used to regularly monitor pets or baby sitters or to see if a stove or iron has been turned off or a garage is closed.

Battery life, however, is a very slight five minutes, but the company says that should be plenty of time for users to propel the drone through most homes at least once throughout the day. An automated charging dock will also fully recharge the Rook within an hour.

A recently launched Indiegogo campaign allows early backers to purchase a Rook for US$99, which is a reduction of over half of the expected regular retail price of $200 to $250.00 and considerably less than the price of more expensive drones designed for outdoor use. The price of the Rook includes soft blade guards to reduce the risk of damage that might occur if the drone runs into items in the home. The company expects to begin shipping the Rook in December 2016 if all goes as planned.

While the Rook may be the first drone designed specifically for in-door use, it joins small drones like the world's tiniest camera drone and the Axis VIDIUS whose small sizes mean you're more likely to find them flying inside than out.

Source: Eighty Nine Robots

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