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Robotics

Just a few of the Kilobots that were part of the swarm

Ants, schooling fish and flocking birds all have something in common – they can achieve things by working together that they could never do on their own. With that in mind, researchers are now looking into ways of allowing "swarms" of communicating robots to accomplish tasks that are difficult or even impossible for single robots. Harvard University recently performed an unprecedented demonstration of that behavior, in which a batch of over 1,000 tiny Kilobots arranged themselves into a variety of pre-assigned two-dimensional shapes.  Read More

A self-folding mobile prototype developed by researchers at MIT and Harvard (Photo: Harvar...

An origami-inspired robot that self-assembles and then scuttles away under its own power has been revealed by researchers from Harvard University and MIT. Still in the experimental stage, the prototype is able to transform itself from a flat structure into a moving, functional machine in around four minutes before scrambling away under its own power at a speed of about 2 in (5 cm) per second.  Read More

Robots created at the University of California are able to look through solid walls using ...

Robots created by a team working at the University of California, Santa Barbara are able to look through solid walls using just Wi-Fi signals. With potential applications in search and rescue, surveillance, detection and archeology, these robots have the capability to identify the position and outline of unseen objects within a scanned structure, and then categorize their composition as metal, timber, or flesh.  Read More

Easy-to-program Edison is a palm-sized bot, compatible with Lego bricks and packing a suit...

With robots set to play a more prominent role in society in the coming years, it makes sense to find fun ways to educate youngsters on the technology. To that end, Thomas Alva has developed Edison, a palm-sized, bright orange, programmable robot compatible with Lego bricks that is intended as an affordable introduction to programming and robotics.  Read More

The team from Eindhoven University of Technology has beaten the University of Beijing in t...

The World Cup may have finished a few weeks ago, but there was another one played in Brazil just last week. The annual RoboCup competition was held in João Pessoa, including the robot soccer World Cup.  Read More

Researchers from the Yamanaka Laboratory at the University of Tokyo have been investigatin...

Robots will form a big part of our lives in the future, but despite the imagination and foresight of the best science fiction writers and filmmakers, it's still not exactly clear how will we accept and interact with them. Researchers at the Yamanaka Laboratory at the University of Tokyo have been investigating the field of robot-human interaction since 2007 by adding different kinds of biological behavior to a series of robotic sculptures. Recently almost all of these sculptures were gathered together for the Bio-likeness prototype exhibition. Gizmag went along to get a feel of their work.  Read More

Jibo is claimed to be the world’s first 'family robot'

Looking like a cross between Pixar’s Luxo Jr lamp and Apple’s iMac G4, Jibo is an interactive electronic buddy that is touted as the "world’s first family robot." Designed to engage with people in a human-like way, Jibo takes on various roles around the house including mail deliverer, environment controller, storyteller, telepresence device, event reminder, and cameraman.  Read More

Honda has unveiled the latest version of its ASIMO robot

Humanoid robots are continually improving and Honda's ASIMO is no different. Honda's first two-legged robot was born in 1986 and since then, subsequent models have become increasingly advanced. Today's newly-announced version is autonomous, intelligent and responsive.  Read More

The robotics material in its hard (left) and soft states

If you've ever watched an octopus, you may have noticed how they can deliver powerful grasping force when necessary, yet can also squeeze through tiny openings by essentially making themselves "liquid." Now imagine if there were robots that could do the same thing. They could conceivably squirm through debris to reach buried survivors at disaster sites, or even travel through patients' bodies to perform medical procedures. An international team of scientists is working on making such technology a reality, using a combination of polyurethane foam and wax.  Read More

Researchers at Georgia Tech found that when assigned the task of teaching a robot to play ...

If Angry Birds is known for anything, it's an ability to keep youthful eyes glued to the screen for extended periods of time. But a new study conducted at Georgia Tech has shown that teaching a robot how to play the video game keeps kids slinging those wingless birds through the air for even longer, a finding that could help in the rehabilitation of cognitive and motor-skill disabilities.  Read More

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